Mark 4:35 Let us pass over unto the other side.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

We might pass through for the one across. OR Should we pass though to the one across?

KJV : 

Mark 4:35 Let us pass over unto the other side.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In Greek, this statement sounds like a question or a suggestion in answer to a question. It contains an uncommon verb and a unique adverb. The "unto" also means "for a purpose." In Greek, the statement sound not only like a direction, but a philosophy for moving forward through and for the other side.

Wordplay: 

There is a double meaning here in the preposition "unto," which also means "for" with regards a purpose.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Διέλθωμεν [uncommon]( verb 1st pl aor subj act )"Let us pass over" is dierchomai, which means "to go through" and "to pass through." It comes from the base, erchomai, which means "to set out", "to come," and "to go." It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place with the prefix dia, which means "through", "throughout," and "in the midst of" and is used to describe passage through both time and space.

εἰς (prep) "Unto" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὸ ( article sg neut acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

πέραν[unique](adv) "The other side" is from the adverb, peran, which means "on the other side", "across", "over against", "opposite," and "right through."

KJV Analysis: 

Let This comes from the form of the following verb, but "might" or "should" are better suited to the actual form of the verb. This sounds like a command, which this isn't. It is a statement.

us This comes from the plural, first-person form of the verb, but it should be "we" rather than us.

pass over )"Pass over" is an uncommon verb that means "to go through" and "to pass through." It comes from a verb common verb base, erchomai, which means "to set out", "to come," and "to go." It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place with the prefix dia, which means "through", "throughout," and "in the midst of" and is used to describe passage through both time and space.

unto The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, or "for" a purpose.

the The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here, it comes before an adverb, not a noun, so the sense is "the one."  See this article for more. 

other side. This phrase doesn't contain the word "other" in Greek or the word "side." This is from an adverb that is used only here by Jesus. It means "on the other side", "across", "over against", "opposite," and "right through." 

Front Page Date: 

Jul 9 2019