Mark 10:23 How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God!

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

How peevishly those, the ones having property into the realm of the Divine are going to enter.

KJV : 

Mark 10:23 How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God!

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

What comes across as a condemnation of wealth in English translation has the  feel of a humorous, positive comment in the original Greek. We have to think about how a verse unfolds to those listening. Jesus's words are full of humor like this, where the meaning of the beginning changes as the saying completes itself. Unfortunately, his words are often drained of their fun in translation. The beginning phrase means simple, "how hard to please!" or "How peevish." The phrase only becomes an adverb, "peevishly" as the sentence unfolds. This is why the verb comes last: it creates the punchline, changing the adjective into an adverb since the verb isn't transitive, taking an object.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πῶς (adv/conj) "How" is pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any means", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

δυσκόλως  (adv/adj pl masc acc) "Hardly" is from dyskolos, which means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," and "difficult to explain." As an adverb. "hardly" and "with difficulty."

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

τὰ (article pl neut nom/acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

χρήματα ( noun pl neut nom/acc) "Riches" is from chrêma (chrema), which means "need", "goods", "property", "money", "merchandise", "substance", "thing", "matter", "affair", "a deal," and "a heap of."

ἔχοντες ( part pl pres act masc nom ) "Have" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."-- The word translated as "the" [The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

βασιλείαν (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τοῦ (article masc sg gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."-- The word translated as "the" [The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

θεοῦ (noun masc sg gen) "of God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity."

εἰσπορεύονται: ( verb 3rd pl fut ind mid )  "Shall enter" is from eiserchomai, which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

KJV Analysis: 

How -- "How" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

hardly -- "Hardly" is the keyword here. It is an adjective that means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," and "difficult to explain." The form of the word is an adverb. As an adverb, it would mean "peevishly" or "fretfully".

shall -- The "shall" comes from the tense of "enter", which is future.

they -- The word translated as "they" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or "those." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. The form is plural, so "those" or "the ones". Since the information is part of the verb form, this is only added for emphasis.

that -- There is no "that" in the Greek. It is added make the following verb active when it is actually an adjective.

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun, here it refers to the following noun, "riches." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

have The word translated as "have" means to "that have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep". The form is an adjective, "having". It pairs with the article above.

riches -- "Riches" is the noun that means "need", "goods", "property", "money", and so on. It is plural with an article so "these properties"

enter "Enter" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."  The tense is future and the form is the subject acting on themselves.

into The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article.The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

kingdom -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

of -- This is from the genitive form of following article and noun.

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God! -- The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods. It is possessive so "of the Divine".

Front Page Date: 

Oct 11 2019