Matthew 24:2 Do you not see all these things

KJV Verse: 

Mat 24:2 See ye not all these things? verily I say unto you, There shall not be left here one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Don't look at all these! Truly I teach to you. Never are they going to be left in this place, stone upon stone, that isn't going to be broken down.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This begins Christ's last "sermon," the one that precedes his death. The general topic is the "end of the world." However, in this verse, there is a confusion with the last part of the verse. As translated in the KJV, the stone isn't going to be thrown down. Though there is a kind of a double negative here, that doesn't make a positive in Greek, but a greater negative. This verse only works when it is spoken and the "no" is a side comment, not part of the sentence.

The verb translated as "see ye" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English. It is in a form that could be either a statement or a command. The question here is possible, but not certain. A question mark does not appear here in the Greek source. All punctuation was added to the Greek source hundred of years later but those adding it did not see a question.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The word translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

The "these things" is from a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective.

The "verily" phrase is used frequently by Jesus. Its meaning is discussed in detail in this article. It usually beings a verse. Its sense seems to fit after a command rather than a question. It's general meaning is "tell you true" or "to reap, I teach you." The word translated as "verily" is from the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like, just missing the initial "a" sound, the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap."

The word translated as "I say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count", like we might say, "to recount" a story, or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

The word translated as "there shall...be left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. So not one stone will be left upon another.

The word "here" is translated from a Greek word meaning "what is present" and "what can be seen." With verbs of action and with a person, it means "here" as in "here I am" in the sense of "I am present."

The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

The word translated as "upon" means "on", "upon", "at", "against", "before", "by" or "on."

The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

Next, the verb "shall...be thrown down" is from the Greek word that means "to dissolve", "to disunite", "destroy", and "break up." It literally means "loosen down" or "break down" from the same root as the word Christ uses to describe things "loose in heaven" and commandments being "broken." Christ's words in the Matthew only used this term once before. He said that he did not come to "destroy" the law but to fulfill it Mat 5:17 . So his prediction of the destruction of the temple is NOT a prediction that God's law, given in the OT, will be destroyed.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -

βλέπετε (verb verb 2nd pl pres imperat act or 2nd pl pres/imperf ind act) "See ye" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding.

ταῦτα (adj pl neut acc) "These things" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." -- The "this" is from a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective.

πάντα; (adj pl neut acc) "All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

ἀμὴν (exclam) "Verily" is from amen, which is from the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." The Hebrew, but it sounds like the Greek word men, which meanings the same thing, more or less, in Greek. (verb pres inf act) It is also the infinitive form of the Greek amao, which means specifically "to reap grain," and generally "to reap" or "to cut."

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I say" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

οὐ μὴ "Not" is from ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

ἀφεθῇ (verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "There shall...be left" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

ὧδε  (adv) "Here" is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means of manner: "thus", "in this way", "so very"; of condition: "as it is", "as follows"; of places:: "hither" and "here".

λίθος (noun sg masc nom) "Stone" is from lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones.

ἐπὶ "Upon" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

λίθον (noun sg masc acc) "Another" is from lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones.

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "That" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

καταλυθήσεται. (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Be thrown down" is from katalyo, which means "to put down", "to destroy", "to dissolve", "to break up", "to dismiss", "to disband", "to abolish", "to bring to an end", "to unloose," and "to unyoke."

The Spoken Version: 

On the way to their camp that night, his followers pointed out the beautiful temple buildings.

"Don't look at them," he said, covering his own eyes, and then peaking though his fingers.

After looking for a while, he shook his head sadly.

"Tell you true," he said in his folksy way. "Never ever are they going to be left in place."

He gestured with his hands, palm out, one on top of the other and commenting, "Stone on that stone, that."

His followers looked at him skeptically.

"No, really\," he assured them, rpopping is hands representing the stones in a falling down motion. "It's going to be knocked down."

His followers were silent as the walked the rest of the way to the grove where they were camped.

Related Verses: 

Front Page Date: 

Jul 10 2016