Matthew 25:5 While the bridegroom tarried,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:5 While the bridegroom tarried, they all slumbered and slept.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

But while the celebrity was taking his time, they all dozed and laid down to sleep.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

What is hidden in this verse is that all the keywords are uncommon ones for Christ to use. While he makes his philosophical point in very simple language, when he tells a story the language becomes much more specific and descriptive because it is more entertaining that way.

Untranslated is the Greek word usually translated as "but" that joins phrases in an adversarial way.

The "while" come from the form of the following two words (genitive absolute) consisting of a participle ("tarrying") and a noun ("bridegroom").

The word translated as "the bridegroom" is a male form of the adjective meaning "bridal," hence, "groom" but weddings were only common "celebrations" to which the girls could get invited, so he plays a more general role, that of "a celebrity." The point is that he is the one who can get the girls into the party.

"Tarried" is from a Greek verb that means "to spend time", "continues", "to take time," and "to linger." It is in the form of an adjective modifying the celebrity.

"Slumbered" is from nustazô, (nustazo), which means "to be half asleep", "to doze," and "to hand one's head."

"Sleep" is from katheudô, (katheudo), which means "to lie down to sleep", "to sleep," and "to lie asleep."

Greek Vocabulary: 

χρονίζοντος (part sg pres act masc gen) "Tarried" is from chronizô (chronizo), which means "to spend time", "continues", "to take time," and "to linger."

δὲ "While" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

τοῦ νυμφίου (noun sg masc gen) "Bridegroom" is from nymphios, which means "bridal", "bridegroom" and "son-in-law."

ἐνύσταξαν (verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Slumbered" is from nystazo, which means "to be half asleep", "to doze," and "to hand one's head."

πᾶσαι "All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." -- The word translated as "all" is from the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐκάθευδον. (verb 3rd pl imperf ind ac) t"Sleep" is from katheudo, which means "to lie down to sleep", "to sleep," and "to lie asleep."

The Spoken Version: 

"But because the celebrity was taking his time," he started.

His followers playing the girls acted disappointed.

"They grew dozy," he continued, laying his head on folded hands, indicating that they should pretend to fall asleep.

Most of them play along, but a few were distracted.

"All of them," he suggested more strongly. "And they laid down to sleep."

He directed them to lay down and pretend to sleep.

Sep 21 2016