Mar 12:34 You are not far from the kingdom of God.

KJV Verse: 

Mark 12:34  Thou art not far from the kingdom of God.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Not far are you from the reign of the Divine.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Jesus only tells one other person, Peter, who and what they are using the second person of the verb "to be." The central question of the Gospels, using this form of the verb, is who Jesus is, not who we are. It often seems as though Jesus is constrained from telling us to much about the nature of reality, but here he gives a little bit away. We are not part of the rule of God, but we are not far from it.

KJV Analysis: 

Thou -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

art -- The verb "art" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

far --  "Far" is from an adverb that Jesus only uses twice, which means "far," and "long."

from -- The word translated as "from" means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

the -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

kingdom

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "thatViews", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

of -- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

God. -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

μακρὰν  [2 times](adv) "Far" is makran, which means "far," and "long."

[εἶ] (verb 2nd sg pres ind act ) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible."

ἀπὸ (prep) "From" is apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

τῆς  (article sg fem gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

βασιλείας (noun sg fem gen) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τοῦ (article)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

θεοῦ. ( noun sg masc gen ) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

If we take this statement as a message from Jesus to us today, it have a very different meaning than praise for a specific person in history, Jesus consistently describes the divine kingdom or divine rule as an on-going process.  What Jesus says here is that we are all close to it, a part of it, even if we don't know what is going on.

Dec 1 2019