Mark 13:10 And the gospel must first be published among all nations.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And for all the races first it must be proclaimed this reward for good news.

KJV : 

Mark 13:10 And the gospel must first be published among all nations.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In English translation, the close connection between the two key words here, "published/preached" and "gospel," is lost both in translation.  The first word means "to be a herald" while the word "gospel/Good News" was the reward heralds received for bringing good news. 

In Jesus's world, the "media" was the physical transportation of information by travel. Communication was often in spoken words.  Private message were often delivered verbally to the intended recipient. Public message were announced in the town center. Written messages were carried, but most people could neither read nor write. They were recorded and read. There was no concept of "publishing" information. As we know it now.

The word translated as "the gospel" is not simply the Greek word meaning "good news," as it is usually represented. It is a longer word describing the reward one gets for bringing good news.  It conflates the two ideas: that of good news and the reward the messenger or herald gets.

Jesus 's use of "gospel" conflated the news and it reward. Knowledge is its own reward.

NIV : 

Mark 13:10  And the gospel must first be preached to all nations.

NLT : 

Mark 13:10 For the Good News must first be preached to all nations

Wordplay: 

This message refers to itself. The two key words both refer to the task of bringing messages. The announcement of the reward for bringing good new (the gospel) is itself good news. The announcement of news is the news. The knowing the news is the reward for the news.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰς (prep) "Among" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

πάντα ( adj pl neut acc ) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τὰ (article pl neut acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἔθνη ( noun pl neut acc ) "Nations" is ethnos, which means "a number of people living together", "company", "body of men," "tribe", "a people", "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations." --

πρῶτον ( adj sg neut acc ) "First" is protos. In place, this means "before", "in front," and, as a noun, "the foremost." Of time, it means "former", "earlier," and, as a noun, "the initial." In order, it means "the first." In math, it means the prime numbers. Of rank or degree, it means "superior" or, as a noun, "the highest" or "the best."

δεῖ ( verb 3rd sg imperf ind act ) "Must" is from, dei, which means "needful," and "there is need."

κηρυχθῆναι ( verb aor inf pass ) "Be published" is kerysso, which means "to be a herald", "to summon by a herald", "proclaim", "call upon", "announce", "declare," and "command publicly." Only in the NT is it translated as "preach" or "teach publicly."

τὸ (article pl neut nom/acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

εὐαγγέλιον. (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Gospel" is euaggelion a "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, ""good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news.

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gospel -- "Gospel" is a noun that means the "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, ""good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news. "Good news" was rewarding for both the one receiving it and the one delivering it. People were happy to deliver good news. Bad news was not rewarding. This word is the "punchline" of the verse, ending it.

must -- The Greek verb translated as "must" is a special verb that means  "it is needful," and "there is a need." It is always singular. It works something like our word "must" but its form is fixed.

first -- The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially."

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

published -- (WW) The word translated as "published" means "to act as a herald", "to proclaim," and "to declare."  It is often translated as "preach" in the NT.

among -- (WW) The word translated as "among" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure. It also means  "for" a purpose, which was how it was used in the previous verse,  Mark 13:9, and here.

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

nations. -- The word translated as "nation" means is "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. This word is frequently translated as "gentiles" in the NT.

KJV Translation Issues: 

3
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "published" means "proclaimed."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "among" means "for."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

gospel -- "Gospel" is a noun that means the "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, ""good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news. "Good news" was rewarding for both the one receiving it and the one delivering it. People were happy to deliver good news. Bad news was not rewarding. This word is the "punchline" of the verse, ending it.

must -- The Greek verb translated as "must" is a special verb that means  "it is needful," and "there is a need." It is always singular. It works something like our word "must" but its form is fixed.

first -- The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially."

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

preached -- (WW) The word translated as "preached" means "to act as a herald", "to proclaim," and "to declare."  It is often translated as "preach" in the NT.

to -- The word translated as "among" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure. It also means  "for" a purpose, which was how it was used in the previous verse,  Mark 13:9, and here.

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

nations. -- The word translated as "nation" means is "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. This word is frequently translated as "gentiles" in the NT.

NIV Translation Issues: 

2
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "preached" means "proclaimed."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

For -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "for" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Good News -- "Good News" is a noun that means the "reward of good tidings," a "thank offering for good tidings, ""good news," and "good tidings." Originally, this term described a reward, like a tip, given to a messenger who brought good news. "Good news" was rewarding for both the one receiving it and the one delivering it. People were happy to deliver good news. Bad news was not rewarding. This word is the "punchline" of the verse, ending it.

must -- The Greek verb translated as "must" is a special verb that means  "it is needful," and "there is a need." It is always singular. It works something like our word "must" but its form is fixed.

first -- The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially."

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

preached --  The word translated as "preached" means "to act as a herald", "to proclaim," and "to declare."  It is often translated as "preach" in the NT.

to -- The word translated as "among" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure. It also means  "for" a purpose, which was how it was used in the previous verse,  Mark 13:9, and here.

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

nations. -- The word translated as "nation" means is "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. This word is frequently translated as "gentiles" in the NT.

NLT Translation Issues: 

3
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for" means "and."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "preached" means "proclaimed."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

It is interesting how the rewards for "news" has been reversed in modern society. Historically, good news was rewarding for the messengers. Bad news was not rewarded and the messengers could be punished. In today's society, the media is rewarded in ratings for delivering bad news. Hence it is in their best interest to find bad news and even manufacturing it.

So there is a sense in this statement that all different types of people and nations will incorporate Christ's message into their laws and as justifications for laws.  We see this, for example, religious law of the Middle ages and in other forms of statism in more modern times. This philosophies all base their appeal on idea of universal charity and justice that was unknown before Jesus, but by making them compulsory, under the treat of coercion by the state, make them meaningless in terms of personal virtue and has been shown to be highly destructive in term of social progress.

Front Page Date: 

Dec 15 2019