Luke 12:9 But he that denieth me before men shall be denied

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The one, however, denying me in front of the people shall deny himself in front of the messengers of the Divine. 

KJV : 

Luke 12:9 But he that denieth me before men shall be denied before the angels of God.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Anyone knowing the Greek would know this is a Luke version because it contains a word only he would use. It combines Matthew 10:33 and Luke 12:8   using a Greek word we first see in Luke 12:6.  The Greek says something more interesting than the KJV in the second phrase. 

The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. Unlike the 

The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

"That denieth" is translated from a Greek word that means "to rejects" and "to deny utterly." The form is that of a verbal adjective, "denying". 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of". It is a preposition that Luke prefers and the other Gospel writers generally don't use. 

The Greek word for "men" in the plural means "person" and "humanity" in the singular and "people" and "peoples" in the plural. It has an article in front of it, "the people".

"Shall be denied" is translated from a Greek word that means "to rejects" and "to deny utterly." The form is not the passive, as translated in the KJV, but the form where the person acting, the denier, acts on himself in the future, "shall deny himself". 

The "before" is the same preposition as used above, again, a unique preference of Luke's. It is not the "before" used in the same phrase in the previous verse. 

"The angels" is a noun meaning "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use from its use in the NT.

The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

(article sg masc nom) "Unto them that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). -

ἀρνησάμενός  (part sg aor mp masc nom) "That denieth" is from aparneomai, which means "to deny utterly", "to refuse", "to reject," and "to deny."

με (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".  

ἐνώπιον [uncommon](prep) "Before" is from enopionwhich means " facing" and "to the front". 

τῶν ἀνθρώπων (verb 3rd sg fut ind mp) "Will...deny" is from aparneomai, which means "to deny utterly", "to refuse", "to reject," and "to deny."

ἀπαρνηθήσεται "Shall be denied" is from aparneomai, which means "to deny utterly", "to refuse", "to reject," and "to deny."

ἐνώπιον [uncommon](prep) "Before" is from enopionwhich means " facing" and "to the front".  τ

ῶν ἀγγέλων (noun pl masc gen) "The angels" is aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use. 

τοῦ θεοῦ.  (noun sg masc gen) "of God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity." 

Front Page Date: 

Mar 28 2018