Luke 8:8 And other fell on good ground, and sprang up

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And another fell into the earth, the worthwhile, and, having been put forth, produced fruit, a hundred times more. The one having ears to hear, he must hear!

KJV : 

Luke 8:8 And other fell on good ground, and sprang up, and bare fruit an hundredfold. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

As we have seen throughout this section, the KJV translation makes all these parallel verses seem more similar than they actually are, with the Luke version here being the most different. Here, however, Luke is less creative than in the other verses of this analogy, using no unique words. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "some" means "another", "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun. In the other two versions, Jesus used the Greek word that means "some", which he more commonly uses. 

"Fell" is translated from a Greek word that means "to fall" and "to fall down." Like our word "to fall" it has a number of special meanings including "to fall into a given class", "to prostrate", "to fall from power", "to perish," and so on.

The word translated as "on" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality.  It is different from the adjective used in Mark and Matthew, which is the other adjective commonly translated as "good" in English.  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." 

The word translated as "earth" means the physical planet. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet. See this article for more on the differences between the planet, the "world,"and "heaven".

The long phrase "sprang up" is a Greek verb meaning "put forth". It is in the form of a passive adjective, "having been put forth". 

The second "and" here was added because the form of the verb above was made active in translation. It doesn't appear in the Greek because the verb above is in the form of an adjective. 

The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

The Greek word translated as "bare" has the primary meaning of "making" or "producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not.  this is a different word than the word translated as "brought forth" in the other versions of this verse.

The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit", "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors." It has a stronger economic sense of return on an investment that our English "fruit," and is even used to mean taxes.

Parallels to the last phrase appear in both Matthew and Mark, but not associated with this parable. 

The Greek verb translated as "He that hath" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb that the English "have" is. The form of the verb is that of an adjective, "having", but used as a noun, introduced by an article, "the one having."

The term translated as "ears" means "ear," things resembling a handle and is a metaphor for understanding.

The Greek verb for "to hear," means "to hear", "to listen", "to obey," and "to understand." It is in a Greek form that the KJV and most other Bible translations translate as "let him hear", but in modern English "let" has the sense of allowing something. That is not the sense in Greek. This is a command, something that must happen. A more accurate translation is "he must hear." 

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj)"And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἕτερον (adj sg neut nom) "Some" is heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly."

ἔπεσεν  (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Fell" is from the verb pipto, which means "to fall", "to fall down", "to be cast down," "fall upon", "intersect (geometry)", "meet", "pass through", "fall violently upon", "attack", "fall in battle", "sink{in water)", "fall short i.e. fail", " fall out of", "lose a thing", "escape from", "fall asleep", "to be accessible to perception", "to fall (between her feet, i.e. to be born)", "to let fall[dice)", "turn out," and "fall under (belong to a class)."

εἰς (prep) "On" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

τὴν γῆν "Earth" is from ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky.

τὴν ἀγαθήν, (adj sg fem acc) "Good" is agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." --

καὶ (conj)"And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

φυὲν [uncommon] (part sg aor pass neut nom) "Sprang up " is phyo, which means "bring forth", "produce", and "put forth".

ἐποίησεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Do" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do." --

καρπὸν (noun sg masc acc) "Fruit" is karpos, which means "fruit", "the fruits of the earth", "seed", "offspring", "returns for profit," and "reward."

ἑκατονταπλασίονα. [uncommon](adj sg masc acc comp) "An hundredfold" is from hekatontaplasiōnwhich means "a hundred times as much or many."

ἔχων (part sg pres act masc nom) "He that hath ears t" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." -- The word translated as "have" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb that the English "have" is.

ὦτα (noun pl neut acc)  "Ears" is from ous, which means "ear" and things that resemble an ear, such as a handle on pitchers, cups, etc. -- The term translated as "ears" means "ear," things resembling a handle and is a metaphor for understanding. 

ἀκούειν (verb pres inf act) "Ye hear" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." -- "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

ἀκουέτω. (verb 3rd sg pres imperat act) "Ye hear" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." -- "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

Front Page Date: 

Nov 22 2017