Luke 12:36 And ye yourselves like unto men that wait for their lord,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 12:36 And ye yourselves like unto men that wait for their lord, when he will return from the wedding; that when he cometh and knocketh, they may open unto him immediately.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And you yourselves similar to men admitting that lord of themselves when he might get free from the wedding. When by showing up and by knocking, straightway they might open for him. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The pronoun "ye yourselves" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural. There is no verb here, but since this word is in the form of a subject, the sense is "you are". 

The word translated as "like" means "like", "resembling," and "matching." 00 The pronoun "you" is used here explicitly. Since this information is in the verb, the pronoun is only used for emphasis. This is something like saying "you yourself" in English. 

The Greek word for "unto men" also means "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, as it is here, it means "people" and "peoples". The word's form is an indirect object, "to men". 

The Greek word translated as "wait" is one that Jesus only uses here. It means "receive favorably", "accept", "admit into one's presence", "admit to citizenship", "admit", "be capable of", "undertake",  "await", "expect",  and "wait". 

The Greek pronoun translated as "their" is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

The word translated as "lord" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

"When" is an adverb that means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

Another unique Greek verb translated as "he will return" means to "unloose", "undo", "set free", "nullify", "dissolve", "reduce", "do away", "cancel", "suspend", "solve the problem", "release from a spell", "loose from moorings", "weigh anchor", and so, "depart", "go away".

The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

The noun translated as "the wedding" means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock."

The word translated as "that" is not the simple demonstrative pronoun, but a word that means "there", "where," and "in order that."

The word translated as "cometh" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. It is in the form of an adjective, so "coming" or "showing up". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "knocketh" also means "to examine" and "to prove." It is in the form of an adjective so "knocking". 

There is no word "that" here. It is added because the verbs are all translated as active, when most of them are adjectives. 

The term for "they may open" means "to disclose" or "to lay open." Unlike most of this verse, this verb is passive, "be disclosed" or "be opened". The tense is the future, "going to be disclosed". The form of this verb is exactly the same as in the previous verse.

 "Immediately" is  an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once."

The word translated as "unto him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective, and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.​

 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "Ye yourselves" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you." --

ὅμοιοι (adv) "Like" is homoios, which means "like", "resembling", "the same", "equal in force, "a match for one", "suiting", "of the same rank", "alike", "in like manner," and "equally." 

ἀνθρώποις (noun pl masc dat) "Unto men" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. 

προσδεχομένοις [unique] (part pl pres mp masc dat) "Wait" is prosdechomai, which means "receive favorably", "accept", "admit into one's presence", "admit to citizenship", "admit", "be capable of", "undertake",  "await", "expect",  and "wait". 

τὸν κύριον (noun sg masc acc) "Lord" is kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." 

ἑαυτῶν (adj pl masc gen) "Their" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

πότε (adv/conj) "When" comes from pote, which means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

ἀναλύσῃ [unique](verb 3rd sg aor subj) "He will return" is analyo, which means to "unloose", "undo", "set free", "nullify", "dissolve", "reduce", "do away", "cancel", "suspend", "solve the problem", "release from a spell", "loose from moorings", "weigh anchor", and so, "depart", "go away".

ἐκ (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from." 

τῶν γάμων, (noun pl masc gen) "The wedding" is the from gamos, which means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock."

ἵνα (adv/conj) "That" is hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because." 

ἐλθόντος (part sg aor act masc gen) "He cometh" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

κρούσαντος  (part sg aor act masc gen ) "Knocketh" is from krouo, which means to "strike", "smite", "strike one against another", "strike together", "knocking", "examine", "try", "prove," and "knock at the door [on the outside]."

εὐθέως (adverb) "Immediately" is from eutheoswhich as an adverb, it means "straight", "simple", "straightway," forthwith", "immediately", "directly," and "at once." --

ἀνοίξωσιν  (verb 3rd pl aor subj ac) "They may open" is from anoigo, which means "to open", "to throw open," and "to disclose."

αὐτῷ. (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." --

Apr 23 2018