Luke 13:32 Go ye, and tell that fox, Behold, I cast out devils,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 13:32 Go ye, and tell that fox, Behold, I cast out devils, and I do cures to day and to morrow, and the third day I shall be perfected.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Being conveyed, proclaim to the vixen, that one, "Look, I toss out demons and healings I accomplish today, and tomorrow, and on the third I bring myself to completion. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This statement is humorous. Its tone was clearly chosen to make light of the threat of death, but that is lost in translation. It also contains a couple of words that Jesus uses nowhere else. 

The Greek verb translated as "go ye" isn't the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT but it is often translated that way. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." However, it also means "convey" both in the sense of conveying things and conveying a message, so it refers both these them being taken and taking a message.  In the passive, as it is here, it means "to be carried" or "to be driven". It is an adjective, "being conveyed". It refers to the fact that these Pharisees seem to have transportation for themselves. In the next verse, Luke 13:33, Jesus points out that he must carry himself, using a different form of the same word. 

"Tell" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

The "that" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. 

The word translated as "fox" actually means "fox" and "vixen". The word can be used either in masculine or feminine forms. Here it is feminine, so "vixen". In Greek as in English, it is a metaphor for a sly, crafty man, but the choice of the female form is clearly meant to be a humorous insult. 

"Behold" is an adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!" In a humorous vein, this about how Christ uses this like we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or "voila" in French. "Look!" or "See!" comes closest in English.

"Cast out" is a verb that means "throw out." Depending on the context, it can mean "toss out", "turn out," or "take out." It is usually translated as "cast out" in the NT.

"Demons" is a Greek word which means "belonging to a demon." It is based on the noun for "demon." The word 'demon" doesn't necessarily mean "evil". In Greek is used to refer to a controlling spiritual power, inferior to the gods. It was used to mean "knowing" and "skilled" in the sense that we might say, "He is a demon poker player." See this article on "demon" and related terms such as "devil". Generally, "having a demon" was how people of Christ's time said that someone had mental problems. See this article on demons and mental illness. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek verb translated as  "I do" is used uniquely here. It isn't the normal "do", but it means "bring to an end", "complete", "produce", "accomplish", "perform", "render", "fill up", and "satiate".

"Cures" is another unique word. It means "healing", "mode of healing", "remedy" , "mending", and "repairs".  

The Greek word translated as "today" is an adverb that means "for today" and "on this day."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The term translated as "to morrow," may be the closest Greek comes to "tomorrow," but the form is an adverb. However, it is introduced by an article ("the") which allows it to act like a noun. The word is an adverb meaning something more like "until tomorrow", "until the morning" meaning "shortly" or "presently." Unlike the noun "tomorrow" in English, this adverb doesn't take in the entire future like we use "tomorrow" to mean "the future". This Greek word always communicates the idea of "in a short time." The term indicates not now but in the immediate future.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The "on the third" means both the third in an order and the fraction one third. It clearly refers to the third day but there is no "day" in Greek.  The "on" comes from the form of he word. 

The Greek verb translated as "I shall be perfected" means "to make perfect", "to make complete", "make perfect", "to bring to consummation," and "to bring fruit to maturity." However, the form is not the future tense nor is it passive. So it is not "I shall be perfected." It is "I bring myself to completion." 

 

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "go ye" means "convey" both in the sense of conveying yourself and conveying a message.

Vocabulary: 

Πορευθέντες (part pl aor pass masc nom) "Go" is poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." In the passive, it means "to be driven" or "to be carried". It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT.

εἴπατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act ) "Tell" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." --

τῇ ἀλώπεκι [uncommon](noun sg fem dat) "Foxes" is from alopex, which means "fox", "Canis vulpes", "a large bat", "muscles of the loins", "mange," and "a type of dance."

ταύτῃ (adj sg fem dat) "That" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." 

Ἰδοὺ (adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see." 

ἐκβάλλω (verb 1st sg pres ind act) "Cast out" is ekballo and means "throw out", "cast out of a place,"and "expose." Ek means "out of", "from," and "away from." Ballo is "to throw" or "to scatter." 

δαιμόνια (noun pl neut acc) "Devils" is daimonion, which means "divinity", "divine power", "a lower divine being," and "evil spirit." Technically, it means "belonging to a demon. "Evil spirit" is a New Testament usage or interpretation. " It is from daimôn, which actually is the noun "demon." The word 'demon" doesn't necessarily mean "evil" (though it seems the way the Jews used it here), but in Greek is used to refer to a controlling spiritual power, inferior to the gods. It was used to mean "knowing" and "skilled" in the sense that we might say, "He is a demon poker player." --  

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἰάσεις [unique](noun pl fem acc ) "Cures" is iasis, which means "healing", "mode of healing", "remedy" , "mending", and "repairs".  

ἀποτελῶ [unique](verb 1st sg pres ind act) "I do" is epiteleo (apoteleo) which means to "bring to an end", "complete", "produce", "accomplish", "perform", "render", "fill up", and "satiate".

σήμερον (adv) "To day" is semeron, which is an adverb that means "for today" and "on this day." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αὔριον, (adv) "To morrow" is from aurion, which means "tomorrow," "tomorrow at this time", and, as an adverb, "on the morrow", "till morning", "presently," and "shortly." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τῇ τρίτῃ (adj sg fem dat) "Third" is from tritoswhich is the Greek word for "third" meaning both the third in an order and the fraction one third. 

τελειοῦμαι. (verb 1st sg pres ind mp contr) "I shall be perfected" is  teleioo, which is a verb that means "to make perfect", "to complete", "to bring to consummation," and "to bring fruit to maturity." 

Related Verses: 

Luke 13:33 Nevertheless I must walk to day, and to morrow,

Jun 7 2018