Luke 12:46 The lord of that servant will come in a day when he looketh not for him,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

He might show up, the master of that slave there, on a day that he is really doesn't expect and on an hour that he really doesn't know. And he is going to split him in two, and that part of him? With the not to be disloyal, he if going to put. 

KJV : 

Luke 12:46 The lord of that servant will come in a day when he looketh not for him, and at an hour when he is not aware, and will cut him in sunder, and will appoint him his portion with the unbelievers.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This first part of this verse is identical with Matthew 24:50. The second part changes one word, the last one, and abbreviates Matthew 24:51

The word translated as "shall come" is a complicated one because it indicates a "coming" that has been completed, that is, "to arrive" or, even, "to be present." As a metaphor, it means "to be a follower." This is not the regular word translated throughout the NT as come.

The word translated as "of that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."

The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

The Greek word translated as "day" also means "time," in general, and refers specifically to the "daytime."

The word translated as "when" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The verb translated as "he looketh", it means "expect", "think", "look for," and "suppose."

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

The word translated as "an hour" means a period of time, generally, as we might say "moment."

"Aware of" is from a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, as it is here, is best translated as "not only...but also."

The most important wordplay here is lost in translating of "Cut asunder" which means "to cut in two", "to bisect," and "to divide in two." This is another uncommon word for Christ, but it is chosen specifically. This idea of being "cut in two" refers both to the two roles that the servant plays, good and bad. However, it strongly suggests a philosophical idea about some part of us being lost upon death after a worthless life but not all. 

Here, the Greek word order becomes important. Following the "cut in two" the Greek says "his part with the distrusting".

The word translated as "appoint" follows the phrase "his part with distrusting". It is from a word that has a lot of different uses and means, "to put", "to place", "to propose", and "to suggest." So it has all the meanings of our "put" and "place" with some extras from the "propose" so it is a metaphor for "to put in one's mind."

"Portion" is from a noun that means a "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny" and "the part one takes". Here, this is another important aspect of the verse's wordplay. It refers both to the destiny of the servant, but also one part of the whole after he was torn in two.

"With" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of".

The last word here is changed. In Matthew, it was "actor". In Luke, it is "distrusting". In the Matthew version, this was more clearly a joke because the servant's fate was "with the actors" and the Greek word for actor means playing a role, having two parts. Changing the last word from "actor" to "distrusting" make the statement more philosophical about what a person believes rather than what he does.  

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἥξει (3rd sg aor subj act or 3rd sg fut ind act ) "Shall come" is from heko, which means "to arrive", "to have come", "to be present", "to have reached a point, "to pass though a point (geometry)", "to have come back", "returned", "to have come to table", "concern", "relate to", "to depend upon," and, as a metaphor, "to be a follower."

κύριος (noun sg masc nom) "Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

τοῦ δούλου (noun sg masc gen) "Servant" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave."

ἐκείνου (adj sg masc gen) "He" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ἡμέρᾳ (noun sg fem dat) "A day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

(pron sg fem dat) "When" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

προσδοκᾷ (verb 3rd sg pres ind/subj act) "When he looketh" is from prosdokao, which means "expect", "think", "look for," and "suppose."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ὥρᾳ (noun sg fem dat) "An hour" is from hora, which means "any period", "season," (especially springtime), "year' (generally), "climate" (as determined by seasons), "duration", "the twelve equal parts into which the period of daylight was divided", "the fitting time" (for a task).

(pron sg fem dat) "When" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

γινώσκει, (verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "Aware of," is from ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

διχοτομήσει [uncommon](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Cut asunder" is from dichotomeo, which "to cut in two", "to bisect," and "to divide in two."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὸ μέρος (noun sg neut nom/acc) "Portion" is from meros, which means "share", "portion", "lot", "destiny", "heritage", "one's turn," the part one takes,""proportion," and "part" (as an opposite of whole).

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

μετὰ "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward."

τῶν ἀπίστων (adj pl masc gen) "The Unbelievers" is apistos, which means "not to be trusted" "mistrustful", "incredulous," disobedient, "disloyal," or "suspicious."

θήσει: (verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Appoint" is from tithemi which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest", "to deposit", "to set up", "to dedicate", "to assign", "to award", "to agree upon", "to institute", "to establish", "to make", "to work", "to prepare oneself," "to bear arms [military]," "to lay down and surrender [military]," "to lay in the grave", "to bury," and "to put words on paper [writing]," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind."

Front Page Date: 

May 1 2018