Luke 17:35 Two women shall be grinding together;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 17:35 Two women shall be grinding together; the one shall be taken, and the other left.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

There shall be two females grinding on the same, the one shall be admitted and the, however, other shall be let loose.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The "women" here is added because the form of the verbal adjective describing them is female. The forms of the verbs are also interesting in terms of who does what do whom and do not completely agree with versions in Matthew (Matthew 24:40, Matthew 24:41), which are in the present tense. There is also an unusual spelling here.

The verb "there shall be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are" or "they are".

The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

The Greek verb translated as "two women shall be grinding" is from a verb that means "to grind" and "to mill." It is in the form of an adjective, "grinding", in the feminine word form (hence "woman") and in the present tense, not the future.

The phrase translated as "together" means "on the same". The word for "on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."  The word for "the" is the Greek article. The word for "same" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek word translated as "one" means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person. It appears here with the article, so "the one".

The Greek translated as "shall be taken" is very uncommon in the Gospels, but very common in Greek though the spelling in non-standard. One of the reasons it is so common in Greek is that it has a wide variety of different uses. It is from a verb that means to "to receive from", "to take upon oneself", "to get control of", "to find", and "to undertake". The root word is very common in the Gospels and its meaning is both to "take" and to "receive" as we use the word "get" in English. The literal meaning is something to "to get with" or "to get from". It also has a number of special meaning such as "to invite" and "to take a prisoner." It doesn't quite mean "taken" except in the sense of taking prisoners. The ending is a future passive ending so "shall be admitted comes closest, but this assumes the same word with a more standard spelling is used in the similar verses in Matthew (Matthew 24:40, Matthew 24:41).

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  In the previous verse, the Greek conjunction "and" as used here.

The word translated as "the other " means "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun with an article before it, "the other". The article is separated from the adjective by the "however"

The word translated as "shall be left" primarily means "to let go" "to pass by", or "to send away." This word is common both in Greek and in the Gospels. This word translated in a wide variety of ways, however, in the Gospels, "leave", "forgive", "suffer," (in the sense of "put up with") and "let" (in the sense of "to leave alone") in the New Testament. This word figures largely in modern Christianity because it is translated as "forgive" in phrases such as "forgive sins". Here the form is passive, but in the similar verses in Matthew, it is the form where someone acts on themselves.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἔσονται  ( verb 3rd pl fut ind mid) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -

δύο (numeral "Two" is duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

ἀλήθουσαι [uncommon] (part pl pres act fem nom) "Grind" is from aletho which is a form of aleo, which means "to grind", "to bruise," and "to mill."

ἐπὶ (prep) "Together" is epi (with to auto below), which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

τὸ αὐτό, (article+adj sg neut nom) "Together" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

μία (article+adj sg fem nom) ) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen.

παραλημφθήσεται [uncommon]( verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) ) "Shall be taken" is from paralambano, which means "to receive from", "to take to oneself", "to admit", "to employ", "to undertake", "to take a pledge", "to take or to receive as a substitute", "to take up", "to catch up", "to invite", "to take to oneself" (as in a wife), "to get control of," and "to take a prisoner." In the passive, it means "to be received", "to be admitted", "to be accepted", "to be found", "to be used", "to be derived", "to be taken prisoner".

(article sg fem nom) "Unto them that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

ἑτέρα (adj  sg fem nom) "Another" is heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly." -- The word translated as "another" means "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun.

ἀφεθήσεται. ( verb 3rd sg fut ind pass ) "leftis from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

Related Verses: 

Oct 3 2018