Matthew 25:28 Take therefore the talent from him,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:28 Take therefore the talent from him, and give it unto him which hath ten talents.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

[Accursed one,] you all, take the [weight] money packet way from him and give it to the one having the ten times the balance.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There are a number of plays on words in this verse that are hidden in translation. However, the verse itself is pretty straight forward.

"Take" is from a verb that has a lot of meanings from "to raise up", "elevate", "to take away," and "to cause to cease." It is not the usual word that Christ commonly uses to mean "take" or "get." However, in this from, it is also an adjective meaning "accursed" referring to a man or woman. It is can command addressed to many people.

The Greek word translated as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative.

The noun translated as "talent" means a "balance" and "a weight" and refers to different amounts of money in different times and places. However, in Christ's time, it seems to means around a hundred dollars. However, more generically, we could all it a "packet" of money,

The verb translated as "give" means "to give", "to hand over", and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give." It to is a command for a group of people.

The word translated as "unto him which " means "to possess" or "to keep." It is in the form of an adjective "having" introduce by an article without a noun, so "the one having."

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἄρατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Take" is from airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove."

οὖν "Therefore" is from oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore."

ἀπ᾽ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

τὸ τάλαντον (noun sg neut acc) "Talent" is from talanton, which means "a balance", "a weight", "a pair of scales", "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortunes of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

δότε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Give" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

τῷ ἔχοντι (part sg pres act masc dat) "Unto him which " is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

τὰ δέκα (numeral) "Ten" is from deka, which means the number ten.

τάλαντα: (noun pl neut acc) "Talent" is from talanton, which means "a weight", "a pair of scales", "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortunes of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

The Spoken Version: 

"Accursed," he declared. "All of you, take the weight of that money packet from him."

He emphasized the idea that the money was a weight as he gestured to some of his followers to act as his attendants.

"And give it," he said, pointing that the follower playing the most successful servant, "to the one having ten packets."

The follow who he pointed at smiled and rubbed his hands together. The crowd laughed.

Oct 13 2016