Matthew 25:25 And I was afraid, and went and hid you talent in the earth:

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:25 And I was afraid, and went and hid thy talent in the earth: lo,there thou hast that is thine.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

"And, being afraid, departing, I buried your money in the ground. See, you have the one."

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

"I was afraid" is a Greek word that means "to terrify" and "to put to flight," but in the passive, it means to be put to flight and be frightened. When applied to people, it means to "be in awe of" or "dread." It is not an active verb, but an adjective, "being afraid."

"Went" is a verb that means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life." It is also not an active verb, but an adjective.

The word translated as "hid" means to "dig up", "dig through", "dig into", but also means to "bury" but it has a number of other specific uses as well.

The word translated as "earth" means the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes as the world. See this articlefor more on these words.

The word translated as "talent" is not the word for any specific amount of money, but the word that means "weight", "a pair of scales," and "sum of money." As money, the amount varied in different systems. A hundred dollars in today's money seems to capture its sense. The "bags of gold" used by some translations is far too much money since any bag of gold in any era would be worth thousands. In Mat 18:24, Christ describes a slave (a servant) as owing ten thousand talents, which, if a "talent" is a hundred dollars, would be a million dollars. This seems a reasonable scale.

"Have" is from the common verb that means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", and "to have means to do."

"That is thine" is from two Greek words. The first is an article, "the", which when it is used without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The second word is a second person pronoun that is introduced but it is not in the possessive form ("thine") but it is in the same form as the article before it. It is also a form that could be the subject of the sentence, which might work better since it would emphasize the "you."

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

φοβηθεὶς (part sg aor pass masc nom) "I was afraid" is phobeo, which means to "put to flight." "terrify", "alarm", "frighten," and in the passive, "be put to flight", "be seized with fear," be frightened", "stand in awe of" (of persons)", "dread (of persons)," and "fear or fear about something." -

ἀπελθὼν (part sg aor act masc nom) "Went" is from aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

ἔκρυψα [uncommon] (verb 1st sg aor ind act) "Hid" is from krypto, which means "to hide", "to cover", "to bury", "to conceal", "to keep secret," and "to lie hidden."

τὸ τάλαντόν (noun sg pl neut acc) "Talent" is from talanton, which means "a weight", "a pair of scales", "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortuns of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

σου (pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is from sou which means "thine" and "your."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

τῇ γῇ: "Earth" is from ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet.

ἴδε (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Lo" is from idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

ἔχεις (verb 2nd sg pres ind act) "Thou hast" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." -- The word translated as "have" means "to possess" or "to keep" but it isn't used in the same way as a "helper" verb that the English "have" is.

τὸ (article sg neut acc ) "That" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

σόν. (adj sg masc/neut nom/acc) "Thine" is from sou which means "thine" and "your."

The Spoken Version: 

"And, being afraid," he continued in mimicked voice, "Departing."

He walked a few steps away and bent over.

"I buried your money in the ground," he said pretending to dig in the dirt. As he found what he was looking for, he handed it from one hand to the other and said, "See, you have the one."

The crowd laughed at this playing both roles.

Related Verses: 

Oct 10 2016