Mark 4:13 Know ye not this parable?

KJV Verse: 

Mark 4:13 Know ye not this parable? and how then will ye know all parables?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

No, you all haven't seen the analogy, this one? And how then all these analogies are you all going learn to know?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The translation into English loses some of this verse's connection with previous verses. The two words "know" here are different words in Greek. The first means "to see" and the second, "to learn to know." The idea is that you must see, before you can hear, and then you can understand.

KJV Analysis: 

Know ye The word translated as "know ye" means primarily "to see" and is used to mean "know' as we use the word "see" to mean "know" in English. The tense is past perfect, so "have known. "

not The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

this The "this" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective.

parable? "Parable" is Greek for "analogy", "comparison," and "illustration." It doesn't mean simply "educational story" as it has come to mean in English. The fact that Christ speaks in analogies and illustrations is critical in understanding His words.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

how then "How" is the adverb that means "how", "how then,"  "by any means", and "I suppose". 

will ye know "Be ye know" is a verb that means "to know", "to recognize", "make known", "to know carnally," and "to learn. The

all parables?

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

οἴδατε ( verb 2nd pl perf ind act ) "Know ye" is oida which is a form of eido, (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know." --

τὴν παραβολὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Parable" is from parabole, which means "comparison", "illustration," and "analogy." It is most often translated in the NT as "parable" but occasionally as "comparison." -- 

ταύτην, ( adj sg fem acc ) "This" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

πῶς (adv/conj) "How then" is pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any mean", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose." -- 

πάσας ( adj pl fem acc ) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

τὰς παραβολὰς ( noun pl fem acc ) "Parable" is from parabole, which means "comparison", "illustration," and "analogy." It is most often translated in the NT as "parable" but occasionally as "comparison." -- "Parable" is Greek for "analogy", "comparison," and "illustration." It doesn't mean simply "educational story" as it has come to mean in English. The fact that Christ speaks in analogies and illustrations is critical in understanding His words.

γνώσεσθε; ( verb 2nd pl fut ind mid ) "You know," is ginosko which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive." --

Related Verses: 

None

Jun 20 2019