John 16:7 Nevertheless I tell you the truth;

KJV Verse: 

Jhn 16:7 Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

At least, I tell the truth for you. This brings you together, since I may be going away. Since if I do not go away, [the one] summoned-from-beside might not make his way toward you. But if I am made to go, I will send him out to you.

Hidden Meaning: 

First, the Greek word for "truth" means literally "not hidden."

The word translated as "it is expedient" primarily means "to collect" or "bring together."

It is interesting that Christ uses the subjunctive, which indicates possibility, to refer to both Christ's and the "Comforters" coming and going, but Christ often uses the subjunctive to refer to the future instead of the future tense.

The word "comforter" really means "summoned from beside." Earlier (Jhn 15:26), Christ used the preposition translated as "from beside" (para) to describe the comforter's relationship with the Father. In this verse, he uses the preposition "toward" to describe his (its?) relationship with use. Again, this suggests a connection between us and the Father, the vine as a channel for truth and revelation.

More interesting is the fact that the word translated as "I depart," is a passive verb. Christ is not saying simply that he "is going" but that he "is being made to go." this is consistent with his statements about following what his Father commands, but it is not the way he has expressed this idea before.

Also note that the verb used to express the idea of Christ's "going away" (aperchomai) is different than the one translated as "depart" poreuô.

Vocabulary: 

ἀλλ᾽ "Nevertheless" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun.

ἀλήθειαν "Truth" is from aletheia, which means literally "the state of not being hidden," means "truth" and "reality" as opposed to appearances.

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is from legô (lego) means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," but it used to mean "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command."

ὑμῖν "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which are the plural forms of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

συμφέρει (3rd sg pres ind act) "It is expedient" is from symphero, which means "to bring together", "to gather", "collect", "to confer a benefit", "to be useful", "work with", "be with," and "agree with." In the passive, it means "to come together", "to engage", "to battle," [of events] "to occur", "to happen," and [literally] "to be carried along with."

ὑμῖν "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which are the plural forms of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἵνα "That" is from hina (hina), which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun.

ἀπέλθω (1st sg aor subj act) "Go away" is from aperchomai (aperchomai), which means "to go away," and "to depart."

ἐάν "If" is from ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) andan (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

γὰρ "For" comes from gar (gar) which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

μὴ "Not" is from (me), which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As class="greek">οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; class="greek">μή rejects, class="greek">οὐ denies; class="greek">μή is relative, class="greek">οὐ absolute; class="greek">μή subjective,class="greek">οὐ objective.

ἀπέλθω (1st sg aor subj act) "Go away" is from aperchomai (aperchomai), which means "to go away," and "to depart."

παράκλητος "Comforter" is from parakletos, which is an adjective that means "called to one's aid", "assisting in legal maters", "acting as an advocate", and "summoned."

οὐ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, class="greek">μήapplies to will and thought; class="greek">οὐ denies, class="greek">μή rejects; class="greek">οὐ is absolute, class="greek">μή relative;class="greek">οὐ objective, class="greek">μή subjective.

ἔλθῃ (3rd sg aor subj act) "Come" is from erchomai (erchomai), which means to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

πρὸς "Unto" is from pros (pros), which means "from (place)", "on the side of", "toward", "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before."

ὑμᾶς "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which are the plural forms of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐάν "If" is from ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) andan (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

δὲ "But" is from de (de), which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences and an adversarial way.

πορευθῶ (1st sg aor subj pass) "Depart" is from poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT.

πέμψω (1st sg fut ind act) "I will send" is from pempo, which means "send", "send forth", "send away", "conduct," and "escort."

αὐτὸν "Him" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

πρὸς "Unto" is from pros (pros), which means "from (place)", "on the side of", "toward", "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to," and "against."

ὑμᾶς "You" is from humas (humas) and humôn (humon), which are the plural forms of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

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