Luke 10:34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 10:34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And approaching, he bound those hurts of his, anointing oil and wine. Putting, however, him upon his own beast, he carried him into a public-house and took care of him. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse is one of the strangest ones in the NT in terms of vocabulary. It has not one or two unique words in it, like other verses in this parable, but a total of eight unique words appearing nowhere else in Jesus's words.  This is 80% of the verbs and nouns appearing in it. This is especially strange because several of these words have more common forms that Jesus uses commonly. This again points to a different source for this story than other quotes from Jesus. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

The word translated as "went" is a special form of the word commonly translated as "come." It has the sense of approaching someone in authority, so "come forward to speak." However, it is in the form of an adjective or noun modifying the subject of the sentence so "approaching".

The first unique word is the one translated as "bound up". It means to "bind on or to", "bind fast", "bind up", "put in bonds", "imprison", "convict", "tie down", "bind by spells", and "enchant". There is a common word that Jesus uses for "bind" elsewhere in the Gospels. 

The word translated as "his" and later on as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

The second unique words is "wounds", which means "wound", "hurt", "heavy blow", "damage", and "defeat".  

The third unique word is "pouring in", which means "pour over", "heap up", "pour over itself", "anoint", "pour itself over", "pour out for a drink".  One of the most common words Jesus uses also means "pour". 

"Oil" is a noun that means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "wine" means "wine" or any fermented juice. Wine, however, is Christ's metaphor for mental thought, the drink affecting the mind. More about this in this article.

The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The fourth unique words is "set", which means "put", and "put on one". Again, there are a couple of common words Jesus uses for the idea of "placing." 

The word translated as "on" means "against", "before", "during", "by" or "on."

The word translated as "his own" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

The fifth unique word is translated as "beast" and means "flocks and herds", "beasts", "singles beast", "ox", "sheep", or "domestic animal."  Jesus elsewhere uses other common words for "horse" and "colt" and "domestic animal". 

"Brought" is a Greek word which means "to lead", "to carry," or "to fetch" and has a lot of different specific meanings in different contexts. 

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The sixth unique word is "inn"which means "inn", "hostel", "hostelry", "public house", and  "rest house", which doesn't appear, at least in this form, anywhere else in ancient Greek literature but which is the word used in modern Greek for "inn".  This word isn't the word used in Luke 2:7 in the famous phrase "no room at the inn". 

The eighth unique word (unique to this story reappearing in the next verse) is "took care" which means "take care of", "have charge of", "management of", and "have charge of".  Again, there is a word that Jesus commonly uses for caring for someone medically. This isn't it. 

Wordplay: 

The strangest verse in the NT in terms of unique vocabulary. 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

προσελθὼν (part sg aor act masc nom) "Went"  is from proserchomai, which means "come", "go to", "approach", "draw nigh," in hostile sense, "attack", "come in", "surrender", "capitulate", "come forward to speak", "appear before a tribunal or official", "apply oneself to," of things, "to be added", "come in (of revenue)" and :"have sexual intercourse."

κατέδησεν [unique](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Bound up" is from katadeo, which means to "bind on or to", "bind fast", "bind up", "put in bonds", "imprison", "convict", "tie down", "bind by spells", and "enchant". 

 τὰ τραύματα [unique](noun pl neut acc) "Wounds" is trauma, which means "wound", "hurt", "heavy blow", "damage", and "defeat". 

αὐτοῦ(adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

ἐπιχέων [unique](part sg pres act masc nom ) "Pouring in" is from epicheo, which means "pour over", "heap up", "pour over itself", "anoint", "pour itself over", "pour out for a drink". 

 ἔλαιον (noun sg neut acc) "Oil" is from elaion, which means "olive oil", "anointing oil," and "any oily substance."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οἶνον, (noun sg masc acc) "Wine" is oinos, which means "wine" and "fermented juice of any kind." 

ἐπιβιβάσας [unique](part sg aor act masc nom) "Set" is eribibazo, which means "put", and "put on one". 

 δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). --

αὐτὸν  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἐπὶ (prep) "On" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against." --

τὸ ἴδιον (adj sg masc acc) "His own" is idios, which means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself", "private", "personal", "personally attached" to one, "separate", "distinct", "strange," and "unusual." --

κτῆνος [unique](noun sg neut acc) "Beast" is from ktenos, which means "flocks and herds", "beasts", "singles beast", "ox", "sheep", or "domestic animal." 

ἤγαγεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Brought" is ago, which means to "lead", "carry", "bring", "fetch", "take with one", "carry of", "bear up", "remove", "lead to a point", "lead", "guide", "manage", "refer", "bring up", "train", "educate", "reduce", "draw out (in length)", "hold", "celebrate", "observe (a date)", "pass (Time)", "hold account", "treat", "draw down (in the scale)," and "weight." --

αὐτὸν  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." 

πανδοχεῖον [unique](noun sg masc acc) "Inn" is from pandocheionwhich means "inn", "hostel", "hostelry", "public house", and  "rest house". (Not in Perseus from Google modern Greek.) 

 καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἐπεμελήθη [unique to this story] (verb 3rd sg aor ind mp) "Took care" is from epimeleomai which means "take care of", "have charge of", "management of", and "have charge of". 

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "Of him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

Related Verses: 

Jan 30 2018