Luke 10:8 And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 10:8 And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And in that possible community you might enter and they might welcome you, devour the ones sitting before you. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The word translated as "whosoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

Untranslated is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today.

"Ye enter" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind." It is it the form of something that might happen. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

"Receive" is a word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. It is in the form of a command or request. 

"You" is the standard plural pronoun.

In today's Greek sources, the following appears in the next verse, but not this one. 

The word translated as "eat" means "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up". It is in the form of a command. 

The word translated as "such things" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or "the ones".  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek verb translated as "as are set" means "place beside", freq. of meals, "set before", "serve up", and generally, "provide", "furnish". It is in the form of an adjective "serving up". 

"You" is the standard plural pronoun. It is in the form of an indirect object.

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." 

ἣν (pron sg fem acc ) "Whosoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

ἂν (particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

πόλιν (noun sg fem acc) "City" is polis, which means "city", "citadel", "one's city", "one's country", "community", "state", "state affairs," and "civic duties."

εἰσέρχησθε (verb 2nd pl pres subj mp) "Ye enter" is eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

δέχωνται (verb 3rd pl pres subj mp) "They receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

ὑμᾶς, (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The "you" here is plural, indicating all Christ's listeners as the object of the verb.

[9] ἐσθίετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Eat" is esthio, which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion. 

 τὰ  (article pl neut acc) "Such things" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. 

 παρατιθέμενα [uncommon](part pl pres mp neut nom ) "As are set before" is from paratithemi, which means "place beside", freq. of meals, "set before", "serve up", generally, "provide", "furnish", "place upon", "lay before one", "explain", "set before oneself", "have set before one",  "deposit what belongs to one in another's hands", "give in charge", "stake", "hazard", "cite in one's own favour", and "cite as evidence or authority".

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

Related Verses: 

Jan 9 2018