Luke 11:8 I say unto you, Though he will not rise and give him,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:8 I say unto you, Though he will not rise and give him, because he is his friend, yet because of his importunity he will rise and give him as many as he needeth.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

I tell you: even if he is not going to give to him, through the cause of being roused by the being a friend of his, at any rate by the cause of future solitude, being awakened, he is going to give to him as many as he has need of. 

Hidden Meaning: 

There are two different words translated here as "will rise" here. Again, we have uncommon words and a unique (for Jesus) word used here. This unique word is a bit of a problem for the KJV and other Biblical translations. 

The word translated as "I say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently.

The Greek pronoun "unto you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

The "though" here is two Greek words meaning literally "if also". The "if" expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. The Greek "also" word is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also", "even". ). The two used together in this order mean "even if" or "even though".

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea. The not is associated with the verb "give" not the following verb, "rising". 

"He will...rise" is a Greek verb that means "to make to stand up", "to raise from the dead", "to rouse to action," and "to make people rise up." The form here is an adjective, "going to rise", and it is not the future tense. It appears after the "him" and is not associated with the "not" above. 

There is not "and" here in the Greek. It is added because to verb above is translated as an active verb instead of an adjective modifying the subject. 

The verb translated as "give" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give." It is in the future tense and is the active verb here, "he is not going to give". This verb comes before the "rise" and following the "not".

The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same."

The word translated as "because" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." The sense here is "by". It does not mean "because". 

The verb "he is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. However, it is not an active verb but a verb used as a noun, introduced by an article, "the being of his" or "his being". 

The term translated as "a friend" is one of three or four words in Greek for "love". This is usually described as "brotherly love". It is in the form of an adjective used as a noun. 

"Yet" another uncommon word (used only twice by Jesus) that means "at least", "at any rate", "namely", "that is", and "that is to say".   

The word translated as "because" is the same as the one above. The sense here is "by". It does not mean "because". 

The unique problem word here is the one translated as "importunity" (which means "demand") in the KJV and "persistence" and "shameless audacity" in other translations. The word is a verb used as a noun describing the meaning of the verb. The verb means "to be alone", "secluded", "to be peculiar", "to be special, superior". The tense is the future. This means this form would mean "the future solitude".  So the sense is, for the sake of future solitude, the man will act.

Where does the KJV and other translations get their meanings? The translators deconstructed the word, which consists of a negative prefix, the Greek noun that means "reverence", "awe", "respect", "regard for others", "shame", "scandal", and "dignity". So the verb would be translated as "the one having no respect", "the one with no regard for others", and "no shame". 

The word for "will arise" in the second part of the verse is different than the first. It means "awaken" and is the same word Christ uses to describe God raising the dead and false prophets arising. Again, it is an adjective and in the passive tense. 

The verb translated as "given" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give." It is the same word as above but in the future tense. 

The word translated as "as" many as" means "as great as", ""as much as," and similar ideas of comparison. This is one of the few times it translated accurately. It is usually translated as "whatsoever". 

The verb translated as "need" means "want", "lack", "have need of", and "desire". Again, it is in the present tense. 

Vocabulary: 

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." 

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

εἰ (conj) "Though" is ei, (with kai below) which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions. With kai before, it means "even if" and with kai after, it means "even though". 

καὶ (conj) "Though" is kai, (with ei above) which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

δώσει (verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Give" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." 

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἀναστὰς (part sg aor act masc nom) "He will...rise" is from anistemi, which means "to make stand up", "to raise up", "to raise from sleep", "to wake up", "to raise from the dead", "to rouse to action", "to put up for sale", "to make people rise", "to emigrate", "to transplant," and "to rise and leave the sanctuary." -- 

διὰ (prep) "Because" is dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." 

τὸ (article sg neut nom/acc ) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." When in preceded an infinitive, the verb becomes a now describing the action, in this case, "the being" or "the existence". 

εἶναι (verb pres inf act) "He is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." 

φίλον (adj sg masc acc) "Friend" is from philos, which as an adjective means "loved", "beloved", "dear", "kith and kin", "nearest and dearest", "friends," and (of things) "welcome" and "pleasant."

αὐτοῦ, (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." --

διά "Because" is dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." --

γε [uncommon](partic) "Yet" is ge, which means "at least", "at any rate", "namely", "that is", and "that is to say".   

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." When in preceded an infinitive, the verb becomes a now describing the action, in this case, "the being" or "the existence". 

ἀναιδίαν [unique](verb fut inf act ) "Importunity" is anaideia, which means "to be alone", "secluded", "to be peculiar", "to be special, superior".  This compound word consists of a negative prefix (ana) and the Greek word αἰδώς (aidos), which means "reverence", "awe", "respect", "regard for others", "shame", "scandal", and "dignity". So the word is thought to mean "no respect", "no regard for others", and "no shame". 

 αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

ἐγερθεὶς (part sg aor pass masc nom) "Will rise" is egeiro, which means "to awaken", "to stir up," and "to rouse." --

δώσει (verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Give" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." 

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." 

ὅσων (adj pl neut gen) "As many as" is hosos, which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as." --

χρῄζει.[rare} (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "He needeth" is from chrezo, which means "want", "lack", "have need of", "desire", "long for", "crave", "if one will", "if one chooses," and, as an adjective, "needy," and "poor."

Related Verses: 

Feb 10 2018