Luke 13:26 Then shall ye begin to say, We have eaten and drunk

KJV Verse: 

Luke 13:26 Then shall ye begin to say, We have eaten and drunk in thy presence, and thou hast taught in our streets.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

At that time, you will start to boast, "We have eaten in front of you and we drank and in these broadways of ours, you taught.  

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse is set up like a "reveal" but that is lost in translation. Until the very last word in the Greek, we do not know the identify of the "master of the house" described to in the previous verse (Luke 13:25) that starts this parable. This verse reveals that identity in its last word as something like a punchline. 

The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then". 

"Ye begin" is from a verb in the form of an adjective that means "to be first", "to begin," and "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command."  

The word translated as "to say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

The word translated as "we have eaten" is one of the two common words used to mean "eat."It means "to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

The Greek term translated as "in" is not used outside of Luke except once in John. It appears here for the first time in Jesus's words here. It means "in front of". 

The word translated as "thy" is possessive form of the second person pronoun. There is no "presence". The direct meaning of this phrase is "in front of you". 

The "and drunk" phrase comes after the "in thy presence" not before. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). 

The Greek verb translated as "thou has taught" means "to teach", "to instruct", and "to give a sign of." It is the root for the common word for "teacher" or "master". The verb is at the end of the sentence, making it less important in standard Greek, but more like a punchline in the way Jesus speaks. 

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The "our" is the plural possessivefirst-person pronoun. This comes after the "streets" making more like "in these streets of ours", as the setup for the important word. 

The Greek word translated as "street" is a noun from the adjective that means "broad". The sense is "broadways" in English. 

Vocabulary: 

τότε (adv) "Then" is tote, which means "at that time" and "then." -- The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then". 

ἄρξεσθε  (verb 2nd pl fut ind mid) "Shall ye begin" is  archomai, which is a form of archô, which means "to be first", "to begin", "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command." 

λέγειν (verb pres inf act ) "To say" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep." 

Ἐφάγομεν (verb 1st pl aor ind act) "We have eaten" is phago which means to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour." 

ἐνώπιόν  [uncommon](prep) "Before" is from enopionwhich means " facing" and "to the front".  

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἐπίομεν, (verb 1st pl aor ind act) "Ye shall drink" is pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." -- The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". 

ταῖς πλατείαις (noun pl fem dat) "Streets" is plateia, which is the noun form of an adjective that means "wide", "broad", "over a wide area", "broad shouldered [of a man]", "far advanced [of seasons]", "strong [oath]", "widespread", "flat of the hand", "frequent," and "street." 

ἡμῶν () "Our" is hemon, which is the plural possessive (genitive) form of the first personal pronoun. 

ἐδίδαξας: (verb 2nd sg aor ind act) "Thou hast taught" is didasko, which means "to teach", "to instruct", "to indicate", "to explain," and "to give sign of." 

Related Verses: 

Jun 1 2018