Luke 14:13 But when thou makest a feast, call the poor,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 14:13 But when thou makest a feast, call the poor, the maimed, the lame, the blind:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

But when an entertainment you produce, invite beggarly--you multiply to infinity--limping, dim.

Hidden Meaning: 

All of the adjectives to describe the needy here have double meanings and, except for one, are previously used in Matthew 11:5.  The new word here is translated as "maimed", but in the Greek, it is a verb meaning "you multiply to infinity". The Greek adjective meaning "maimed" is spelled slightly differently. And the word translated as "feasts" is a unique word, not the word translated elsewhere as "feast" in the NT. 

The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word for "other" like we use "otherwise".

The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

"Feast" is a noun Jesus only uses it. It means  "reception", and "entertainment."

The Greek word translated as "thou makest" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is the word usually translated as "do" in the NT but "make" is closer to the Greek.

The term translated as "call" is like our word "call" (and probably its source) because it means both "to summon" and also "to name." The KJV has been translating it as "bade" or "bidden" in recent verses such as Luke 14:10

"The poor" is an adjective that means "a beggar" and "beggarly" and it a metaphor for being lacking in something. It doesn't have an article "the" on it, as none of these adjectives do. 

The fun word here is translated as "maimed", which is almost the Greek adjective that means "maimed" or "mutilated" but which is actually the Greek verb meaning "you multiply by infinity". It seems like a play on words as a side comment about the poor.  The Greek adjective meaning "maimed", unlike the other adjectives here, has no double meaning so it seems Jesus is adding one for it. 

"The lame" is a word that means both "limping" and 'defective." It is a near sound alike for a word meaning "bitter". It has no article "the" before it. -

"The blind" is a word that means both physically and mentally blind. It also means all things that are obscure. It has no article "the" before it.

Wordplay: 

The word here that sounds like "maimed" is actually a word meaning "multiply by infinity" referring to the poor." Poor means lacking something. Lame means defective or bitter. Blind means dim-witted. 

Vocabulary: 

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

ὅταν (adv/conj) "When" is from hotan, which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)."

δοχὴν [unique] (noun sg fem acc ) "Feast" is doche, which means  "reception", and "entertainment."

ποιῇς, (verb 2nd sg pres subj act ) "Thou makest" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

κάλει (verb 2nd sg pres imperat act ) "Call" is kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand."

πτωχούς, (adj pl masc acc) "Poor" is ptochos, which means "beggar", "beggar-woman," and "beggarly." -- "The poor" is a word that means "a beggar" and "beggarly" and it a metaphor for being lacking in something.

 ἀναπείρους, (ἀναπήρους) [uncommon](adj pl masc/fem acc) "The maimed" is assumed to be anaperos, which means "maimed", and "mutilated", but the actual word in Greek is apeipoo, (verb 2nd sg pres ind act) which is a verb meaning "multiply to infinity". 

 χωλούς,  (adj pl masc nom) "The lame" is from chôlos, which means "lame", "limping," and "defective." A very similar word, cholos, which means "gall", "bitter", "angry," and "wrathful."

τυφλούς: (adj pl masc nom) Blind" is from typhloswhich means "blind", "lacking vision of the future," [of things]"dim", "obscure", "dark," [of passages] "blind", "enclosed", "with no outlet," and is a metaphor for lacking sense." -- 

Related Verses: 

Jun 18 2018