Luke 14:9 And he that bade thee and him come and say to thee, Give this man place;

KJV Verse: 

Luke 14:9 And he that bade thee and him come and say to thee, Give this man place; and thou begin with shame to take the lowest room.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And showing up, the one you and him inviting, will say to you, "Give to this one a place." And then you will begin with dishonor the furthest place to occupy. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse is an example of how Jesus tends to put key verbs at the end of phrases rather than earlier when in Greek, the more important words usually come first. This often has a humorous affect. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "he that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The term translated as "bade" is like our word "call" because it means both "to summon" and also "to name," but it does not as clearly mean "to address." We would say "invite". 

The "thee" here is singular. This is uncommon for Christ when he is teaching, meaning that the line was likely addressed to an individual instead of all his listeners. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas.  It is not an active verb, but an adjective form ("coming") and was at the beginning of the verse.

There is no "and" here.

"Say" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming. This is the active verb. Earlier verbs were adjective describing the person coming and inviting. 

The verb translated as "give" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give." It is in the form of a command. 

The word translated as "this man" means "from here" or "this/that thing." It is masculine but "this one" is closer than "man". 

"Place" is translated from a Greek word that means "place", "position," and "topic." It has no article so "a place". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek word for "then" appears here but isn't translated. It means "at this time" or "then". 

"Thou begin" is from a verb in the form of an adjective that means "to be first", "to begin," and "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command."  The two meanings, "to start" and "to command" create different meanings when paired with the following verbs.  The form is someone acting on themselves, so "make a start for yourself" or "command yourself". 

"With" is the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It is not the term usually translated as "after."

"Shame" used by Jesus uniquely here. It means "shame", "dishonor", and "sense of shame".

"To take" is from a verb that means to "hold fast", "hold back", "withhold", "inhibit",  "gain possession of", "be master of",  and"possess, occupy". It is not the common word translated as "take". 

"The lowest" is from an adjective that, in space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." If the context is the previous verse, it can refer to distance or people so it means "furthest" or "meanest". However, clearly, its use is intended for a double meaning, meaning both. KJV English has a double meaning as well, but it is not quite the same. 

"Place" is translated from a Greek word that means "place", "position," and "topic." this is a fairly uncommon word for Christ to use.

Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

ἐλθὼν (part sg aor act masc nom)  "Come" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. 

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. 

σὲ (pron 2nd sg acct) "Thee" is from se, the second person singular accusative pronoun. 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αὐτὸν  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

καλέσας (part sg aor act masc nom) "Bade" is kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand."

ἐρεῖ (verb 3rd sg fut ind act ) "Says" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." --

σοι (pron 2nd sg dat) "To thee" is soi which is the singular, second person pronoun, "you". -- The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

Δὸς (verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Give" is didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

τούτῳ (adj sg masc dat ) "This man" is touto, which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]." 

τόπον, (noun sg masc acc) "Place" is from topos, which means "place", "region", "position", "part [of the body]", "district", "room," and "topic." It is also a metaphor for "opening", "occasion," and "opportunity." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τότε (adv) Untranslated is tote, which means "at that time" and "then."

ἄρξῃ (verb 2nd sg fut ind mid ) "Thou begin" is from archomai, which is a form of archô, which means "to be first", "to begin", "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command."

μετὰ (prep) "With" is meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward." --

αἰσχύνης [unique](noun sg fem gen ) "Shame" is  aischyne, which means "shame", "dishonor", and "sense of shame". 

 τὸν ἔσχατον (adj sg masc acc) "The lowest" is eschatos. In space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending." -

τόπον (noun sg masc acc) "Place" is from topos, which means "place", "region", "position", "part [of the body]", "district", "room," and "topic." It is also a metaphor for "opening", "occasion," and "opportunity."

κατέχειν.  [uncommon](verb pres inf act) "To take" is from katecho, which means to "hold fast", "hold back", "withhold", "inhibit",  "gain possession of", "be master of", "possess, occupy", "follow close upon", "press hard", "control oneself", "keep back for oneself", and "embezzle". -- "Keep" is from a verb that means to "hold fast", "hold back", "withhold", "inhibit",  "gain possession of", "be master of",  and"possess, occupy". It is not the common word translated as "keep" used in Matthew 13:23, which is usually translated as "to have". This is a more complex form of that word meaning "keep under" but it has a number of specific uses. 

Jun 14 2018