Luke 21:31 So likewise ye, when ye see these things come to pass,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 21:31 So likewise ye, when ye see these things come to pass, know ye that the kingdom of God is nigh at hand.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

This is why also you yourselves when you might see these happenings, you learn to know that nearly it exists the realm of the Divine.

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse stands out from the similar verses in Matthew and Mark because it does not mention a "door" at the end as they do. It copies some of the  uncommon structures in Luke 21:28. However, this verse uses no uncommon words, which is unusual for this section of Luke.

"So " is translated from a Greek word that in its adverbial form, so it means "in this manner" or "in this way."

The Greek word translated as "likewise" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). After words implying sameness "as".

, The pronoun "ye" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

The Greek word translated as "when" introduces a phrase that explains a certain condition so "whenever" or "since."

The verb translated as "ye see" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive." The form is that of something that might happen.

The "these things" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why." It is not typically used as an adjective.

The word translated as "to come to pass" means "to become," or, of events, "to happen",  that is, to enter into a new state. Though this is the infinitive of the verb, "to happen", it acts as the subject of a sentence. Infinitives introduced by an article, or in this case, a related adjective, act as a noun describing the verb's action. So "to happen" becomes "these happenings", following the plural form of the adjective. This is the same construction as we saw in Luke 21:28.

The word translated as "know ye" means literally, "on learning to know" or "by learning to know." Generally, it means "to witness" or "to discover."

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

The adverb translated as "nigh at hand" means near in time or distance.

Vocabulary: 

οὕτως (adv) "So" is from houtos (houtos), which as an adverb means "therefore," and "that is why."

καὶ (conj/adv) "Likewise" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but."

ὑμεῖς, ( pron 2nd pl nom ) "You" is from ὑμεῖς hymeis, which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

Ὅταν )conj) "When" is from Ὅταν (hotan), which means "whenever (as a condition)," and "since (as a cause)."

ἴδητε ( verb 2nd pl pres subj act ) "Ye see" is from (eido) which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

ταῦτα ( adj pl neut acc ) "These things" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

γινόμενα (part pl pres mp neut acc) "Come to pass" is from gignomai (ginomai), which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be."

γινώσκετε ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act )"Know ye," is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

ὅτι ( (adv/conj) "That" is from hoti (hoti) which means "that" "because," and "since."

ἐγγὺς (adv) "Nigh at hand" is from eggys, which means "near", "nigh", "at hand," nearly", "coming near," and "akin."

ἐστιν ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "Is" is from eimi (eimi), which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign." -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

τοῦ θεοῦ. (noun sg masc gen) "Of God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity." -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Christ often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

Related Verses: 

Jan 19 2019