Luke 22:36 But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 22:36  But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Rather at the present moment, the one having a bag, he must take up, Likewise, also the food pouch. And the one not wanting to have, he must exchange those clothing of his and he must buy a short sword.

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse was spoken in a way to create suspense because its punch line, that is, a key word is saved until the end, This suspense is moved to the middle of the sentence so that ithe sentence reads more easily, but that destroys its suspense. Another hidden element here is that the negative in "no sword". It is the negative of thought and desire. And it doesn't apply to "the sword" but to "having". 

The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

The Greek word translated as "now" \means "now", "at the present moment","presently," and "as it is."

The word translated as "he that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The word translated as "hath" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and so on. It isn't an active verb, but in the form of an adjective, "having" as in "the one having".

The Greek word translated as "purse" here means "bag", "pouch", and "purse." This word is used in Luke 10:4, but not in similar verses in Matthew. It doesn't mean a money purse specifically, but any kind of bag. Though Matthew 10:9 has the word "purse" in English translation, the Greek word in that verb means "belt", which is where money was put during the era.

"Let him take" is one of Christ's favorite "multiple meaning" words. It is a verb that means "to raise up", "elevate", "to bear", "to carry off", "to take and apply to any use," and "to cause to cease." The sense here is "take up", but the form is a third-person command, a form we don't have in English. The sense is "he must take up" or "let him take up".

There is no "it" here, but earlier objects in a Greek sentence (here "a purse") can be assumed to be the object of later transitive verbs with repetition or a pronoun.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). However, this "and" appears after the following adverb "likewise", not before.

The word translated as "likewise" is an adjective that means "like", "resembling," and "matching."  As an adverb, the form here, it means "likewise", "similarly" and so on.

There is no "his" in Greek.

"Scrip" is translated from a Greek word specifically meaning a leather pouch to carry food or provisions for traveling. We might call this a knapsack or provisions bag.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). However, this "and" appears after the following adverb, not before.

The word translated as "he that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. This begins a phrase that repeats and earlier pattern.

The word translated as "hath" means to "have", "possess", "bear", "keep close", "have means to do",  "to have due to one", or "keep" and so on. It isn't an active verb, but in the form of an adjective, "having" as in "the one having".

The negative "no" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. It doesn't come before "sword", which actually appears at the end of the sentence. It comes before "having", so the sense is "the one not wanting to have".

There is no object of "having" here. This is clearly intentional in order to create suspect. The listeners expect an object for "have" especially from the earlier pattern in the sentence. The suspense created by its absence is particularly strong because they would be curious what someone wouldn't "want to have", since not wanting to have is rarer than not having.

The word "sword" is the last word in the verse. Its punchline. Listeners would expect it here but they are intentionally frustrated so it can be a surprise at the end of the verse. The term for "sword" specifically means a short sword, a weapon like a machete, since the Greek word used here is the source for the word "machete." Jesus seems to use "the sword" as a symbol for struggle, which is n necessary. Christ says explicitly that his larger purpose is not to bring peace but the sword in Mat 10:34

"Let him sell" is a word that means "to sell" and "to exchange." When this word is applied to people (as it is metaphorically here), it means "to betray" or "to give up."

 The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

The word translated as "garment" means an outer garment ("a cloak"), like we would use a coat or jacket today. This quality of this garment was how people judge social status.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

"Buy" is an uncommon verb that means "to occupy a marketplace", "to buy in the market," and "to buy for oneself." The form is again a third-person command, a form we don't have in English. The sense is "he must buy" or "let him buy". 

There is no "one" here. This is where the word "sword" appears at the punchline.

Wordplay: 

Vocabulary: 

Ἀλλὰ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

νῦν (adv) "Now" is nyn (nun), which means "now", "at the present moment", "at the present time", "just now", "presently," and "as it is."

( article sg masc nom ) "Him that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. --

ἔχων ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." --

βαλλάντιον [uncommon](noun sg neut acc) "Purse" is from ballantion, which means "bag", "pouch", and "purse."

ἀράτω, ( verb 3rd sg aor imperat act ) "Let him take" is airo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to raise up", "to exalt", "to lift and take away," and "to remove." In some forms, it is apaomai, which means to "pray to," or "pray for."

ὁμοίως (adv) "Like" is homoios, which means "like", "resembling", "the same", "equal in force, "a match for one", "suiting", "of the same rank", "alike", "in like manner," and "equally." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πήραν, (noun sg fem acc) "Scrip" is from pera, which means a "leather pouch to carry food", "a bag for traveling," or "a wallet."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

( article sg masc nom ) "Him that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. --

ἔχων ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Hath" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to have due to one", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." 

πωλησάτω ( verb 3rd sg aor imperat act ) "Let him sell" is poleo, which means "to sell," "to exchange", "to barter," "to offer to sell," and "to retail." Metaphorically, it means to "give up" and "betray." In the passive, it means "to be sold", "to be offered for sale," and, of persons, "to be bought and sold," and " betrayed." --

τὸ ἱμάτιον ( noun sg neut acc ) "Garment" is himation, which was an oblong piece of cloth worn as an outer garment. The term generally means "clothes" and "cloth." --

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" ( is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀγορασάτω [uncommon]( verb 3rd sg aor imperat act ) "Buy" is from agorazo, which means "to occupy a marketplace", "to buy in the market," and "to buy for oneself." -- 

μάχαιραν. (noun sg fem acc) "Sword" is machaira, which means a "large knife", "large dagger", "short sword," or "dirk." It specifically the type of weapon used for making sacrifices, by assassins, bodyguards, and jugglers.

Related Verses: 

Feb 16 2019