Mat 11:19 The Son of man came eating and drinking,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 11:19 The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a wine bibber, a friend of publicans and sinners. But wisdom is justified of her children.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

He showed up, the son of the man, eating and drinking, and they say See for yourselves! A man, a glutton, and a wine drinker. Of tax collectors? Beloved! And of troublemakers! And it has been proven right, the wisdom from those children of hers.

Hidden Meaning: 

The first part of this verse sounds exactly like speech rather than something written, but the last part of confusing. What "wisdom" is being referenced? Who at the children? Most biblical translations want it to mean that wisdom is proven by its deeds, which causes many of them to change the word "children" to something else just as the change the final "and" into a "but". More likely, the end of this verse is a humorous self-deprecating statement agreeing with what proceeded it.

The word translated as "son" more generally means "child." See this article about the "the son of the man" phrase. 

The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural. However, it is introduced by the article "the", "the man". This article is stronger in Greek than English, more like "this man". 

The word translated as "came" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being under way." See this article on its meaning. Most recently, we translate as "show up". 

"Behold" is from verbal command to "See for yourselves". 

The words for "gluttonous" and "wine-bibber" are all nouns in the same form as "a man." There is no "is". It is a list of words describing a "man". 

The term translated as "friends" is an adjective means "loved", "beloved," and "dear." More on the various related words for "love" in this article

"Sinners" is the Greek word that means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. Only in biblical translations is this term given the sense of wickedness. More about the translation issues regarding "sin" here in this article.

"But" is the conjunction usually translated as "and" or "but" though it is usually translated as "and" in the Bible.  It is translated as "but" to create a separation for the earlier phrases in this verse. That division does not exist in the Greek. The following continued the s

Wisdom" is a word meaning "cleverness", "skill", "learning," and "wisdom." The Greek word, Sophia, was the goddess of wisdom among the Greeks. Among the Jews, this attribute was first recognized as an attribute of God and was later identified with the Spirit of God.

"Is justified" is a verb that means "to set right", "hold or deem right", "proved", "tested," and "to do a man justice." It is a passive form.

"By" is a preposition of separation, separating from a place upon leaving, separating a part from a whole, separation of time or space. It is also a preposition of origin, of a place where something came from or the origin of a cause.

"Her" is translated from a Greek word that means "self" and "the same", "myself", "yourself", "himself" and "herself" which can mean "by itself," and "by itself alone."

The word translated as "children" is a word Christ commonly to refer to children. It means "that which is born", "child," and "the young."  However, the reference to "children" here most likely is a reference to Christ comparing his generation to children in Mat 11:16. This would have been clearer if Christ has used the same Greek word for "children" in both verses. However, this phrase seems an example of Christ's self-deprecating humor, where Christ is accepting his critics' assessment of him: he does like eating and drinking and tax collectors and people with problems love him. 

 

Vocabulary: 

ἦλθεν (3rd sg aor ind act) "Came" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. -

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child."

τοῦ ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. --

ἐσθίων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Eating" is from esthio, which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

πίνων, (part sg pres act masc nom) "Drinking" is from pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." -

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

λέγουσιν (3rd pl pres ind act ) "They say" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Ἰδοὺ (verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is from idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see." --

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "A man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. --

φάγος (noun sg masc nom) "Glutton" is phagos, which simply means "a glutton."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

οἰνοπότης, (noun sg masc nom) "Wine bibber" is oinopotês, which means "wine drinker."

τελωνῶν (noun pl masc gen) "Of tax collectors" is telônês, which means a collector of taxes, tolls, or customs.

φίλος (adj sg masc nom) "A friend" is from philos, which as an adjective means "loved", "beloved", "dear", "kith and kin", "nearest and dearest", "friends," and (of things) "welcome" and "pleasant."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

ἁμαρτωλῶν. (noun pl fem gen) "Sinners" is from hamartolos, which means "erroneous" or "erring." It also means "of bad character" but with the sense of being a slave or low-born not evil. --

καὶ (conj)  "But" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

ἐδικαιώθη (3rd sg aor ind pass) "Is justified" is from dikaioo, which means to "set right", "hold or deem right", "proved", "tested," "claim or demand as a right", "that which is ordained", "pronounce judgment", "have right done one", "chastise," and "punish."

σοφία (noun sg fem nom) "Wisdom" is from sophia, which means "cleverness", "skill," and "learning." This was seen as an attribute of God and a gift from God to men. Sophia was the Greek goddess of learning and in Christianity is used as a symbol for Mary, the mother of Jesus.

ἀπὸ (prep) "By" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

τῶν ἔργων (noun pl neut gen) "Children" is from teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young."

αὐτῆς. (adj sg fem gen) "Her" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

Related Verses: 

Jul 4 2017