Matthew 15:7 Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy of you,

Spoken to: 

The Pharisees

Context: 

Answering the Pharisees regarding ignoring traditions.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Play actors, Isaiah predicted you truly, teaching:

KJV : 

Matthew 15:7 Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy of you, saying,

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek for "the hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. It means "actor" from its literal meaning, "under separation," which describe the separation between what is said and reality. Interesting enough, it also means "interpreter," which is another separation between what is said and reality.

NIV : 

Matthew 15:7 You hypocrites! Isaiah was right when he prophesied about you:

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὑποκριταί, (noun pl masc nom/voc) "Ye hypocrites" is from hypokrites means "interpreter" or "actor."

καλῶς (adv) "Well" is from kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base." The form is either an adverb or an adjective, but the adjective form doesn't belong here.

ἐπροφήτευσεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Did...prophesy" is propheteuo, which means "to be an interpreter of the gods", "to be an intermediary in asking", "to be one with oracular power", "to hold the office of prophet", "to be a quack doctor," and "to have a spiritual impulse to teach, refute, reprove, admonish, comfort others."

περὶ (prep)"About" is from peri, which means "round about (Place)", "around", "about", "concerning", "on account of", "in regard to", "before", "above", "beyond," and "all around."

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

Ἠσαίας (3 verses](proper name, sg, masc, nom) "Esaias" is from the Greek Ēsaias, which is the Greek word for the prophet Isaiah.

λέγων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Saying" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out, ""choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

KJV Analysis: 

Ye - This is from the vocative form of the noun that means it names the person being talked to.

hypocrites,  -- The Greek for "hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. The primary meaning during Christ's era was "an actor." See this article on the word and its wordplay.  Interestingly enough, it also means "interpreter," which is another separation between what is said and reality. Its literal meaning is "beneath separation," which describes the separation between fact and fiction, real action versus pretended action. The form is one of address.

well  - The word translated as "well" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." I See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

did -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

Esaias - -  "Esaias" is the Greek spelling of the English name, Isaiah.

prophesy  - (UW) The word translated as "did...prophesy" doesn't actually means to make prophesies, but "to be a prophet." This has a broader meaning in the original Greek than in English. In English, it is limited to foreseeing the future, but in Greek, it means "being an interpreter for the gods," and, not surprisingly, "being a quack doctor." The English word is an untranslated form of the Greek word.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

you, -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

saying,  - The word translated as "Saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "prophesy" means "being a spokesperson for God." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.

NIV Analysis: 

You - This is from the vocative form of the noun that means it names the person being talked to.

hypocrites,  -- The Greek for "hypocrites" is a great example of a word that has taken its English meaning from how it is used in the Bible rather than the original Greek. The primary meaning during Christ's era was "an actor." See this article on the word and its wordplay.  Interestingly enough, it also means "interpreter," which is another separation between what is said and reality. Its literal meaning is "beneath separation," which describes the separation between fact and fiction, real action versus pretended action. The form is one of address.

Isaiah - -  "Isaiah" is the Greek spelling, Esaias, of the English name.

was -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "was" in the Greek source.

right -  (WW) The word translated as "right" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." The from is an adjective so "beautifully," or "well."  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

when -- -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "when" in the Greek source.

prophesy  - (UW) The word translated as "did...prophesy" doesn't actually means to make prophesies, but "to be a prophet." This has a broader meaning in the original Greek than in English. In English, it is limited to foreseeing the future, but in Greek, it means "being an interpreter for the gods," and, not surprisingly, "being a quack doctor." The English word is an untranslated form of the Greek word.

about -- This word "about"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession.

you, -- The word translated as "your" is a plural, second-person pronoun in the genitive case. This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "saying" -- (MW The missing word is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. The form is a present participle, "saying."

NIV Translation Issues: 

4
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "was" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "right" should be "well."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "when" doesn't exist in the source.
  • UW - Untranslated Word -- The word "prophesy" means "being a spokesperson for God." It is the untranslated Greek word adopted into English.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 18 2021