John 10:12 But he that is an hireling,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

He who works for payment is just not a leader. His flocks are not his own. He size up an approaching danger and abandons the flock by taking flight. And the danger seizes and divides them. >

KJV : 

Jhn 10:12 But he that is an hireling, and not the shepherd, whose own the sheep are not, seeth the wolf coming, and leaveth the sheep, and fleeth: and the wolf catcheth them, and scattereth the sheep.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There is a sense in the Greek that when something is not "your own" (idios) that you are not personally attached to it. Ownership is a part of caring. Christ's idea of being being "in" a person, the Father in him, he in us, etc. is a form of ownership, a sense of being invest in someone or something else. Where your treasure it is where your heart is. The hired hand, who has no ownership in the herd doesn't protect what is not his own against destruction. He protects what is his own, his life. this is not evil but how the world really works.

The Greek word translated as "seeth" isn't the simple word for seeing, but a word carrying the sense of looking at something with wonder, shock, or surprise.

The word translated as "leaveth" is the word used to mean "forgive" as in "forgiving sins." It has more the sense of dropping something because you no longer care about it.

In a symbolic sense, the flock is productive, while the wolf is destructive, feeding off what is productive. The word translated as "catcheth" also means "to be a robber" which logically connects the "wolf" with the robbers mentioned in Jhn 10:10 and Jhn 10:1.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

μισθωτὸς "A hireling" is from misthrotos, which means "hired", "hired servant", "hireling," and [military] "mercenary."

καὶ"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐκ , "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ὢν (part sg pres act masc nom) "He that is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ποιμήν "Shepherd" is from poimên (poimen), which means "herdsmen", "shepherd," and, generally, "captain," and "chief."

οὗ ,"Whose" is from hos (hos), which is the demonstrative pronoun in its various forms (hê, ho, gen. hou, hês, hou, etc. ; dat. pl. hois, hais, hois, etc. gen. hoou). It means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔστιν "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

τὰ πρόβατα "The sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks."

ἴδια "His own" is from idios (idios), which means "one's own", "pertaining to one's self", "private", "personal", "personally attached", "separate", "distinct", "strange", "unusual", "peculiar," and "appropriate."

θεωρεῖ 3rd sg pres ind act) "Seeth" is from theōreō (theoreo), which means "to see", "to look at", "to behold," (of the mind) "to contemplate", "to consider", "to observe (as a spectator)", "to gaze", "to gape", "to inspect (troops)" and, in abstract, "to theorize" and "to speculate." It originally means literally, " to be sent to see an oracle."

τὸν λύκον "The wolf" is from lycos (lucos), which means "wolf", "grisly", "jackals", "anything shaped like a hook", "a kind of noose," and "an engine of war for defending gates."

ἐρχόμενον (part sg pres mp neut acc) "Coming" is from erchomai (erchomai), which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀφίησιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Leaveth" is from aphiêmi (aphiemi), which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

τὰ πρόβατα "The sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

φεύγει, (3rd sg pres ind act) "Fleeth" is pheugo, which means "to flee", "to take flight", "avoid", "escape", "seek to avoid", "to be expelled", "to be driven out", "go into exile", "go into banishment", "to be accused", "to be plead in defense," and "to flee from a charge."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

λύκος "The wolf" is from lycos (lucos), which means "wolf", "grisly", "jackals", "anything shaped like a hook", "a kind of noose," and "an engine of war for defending gates."

ἁρπάζει (3rd sg pres ind act) "Catcheth" is from harpazō which means which means "to snatch away", "to carry off", "to be a robber", "to seize hastily", "to grasp with the senses", "to captivate", "to ravish," and "to plunder."

"Them" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

3rd sg pres ind act) "Scattereth" is from skorpizo (skorpizo), which means "to scatter", "to disperse", "to disintegrate", "to reduce to powder," and "to dissipate."