John 7:8 Go ye up unto this feast:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

"You go on up to the festival. I'm not taking this holiday yet because my calendar isn't quite open yet."

KJV : 

Jhn 7:8 Go ye up unto this feast: I go not up yet unto this feast; for my time is not yet full come.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is another one of those rare times where Christ refers to time. Following up on the verse before last (Jhn 7:6), Christ says he doesn't yet have time to go up to the festival.

Again, the translation comes out as somewhat peculiar because we refer to time differently in English. We don't talk about time being "full" or "empty." However, we do talk about our calendars being "full" or "open" so those phrases have a little more of the feeling of the Greek.

Talking about the "fullness of time" seems a little pretentious in English, but we just say this differently. We talk about being "ready" for something, which has pretty much means the same thing.

Reading the Greek, this whole conversation has a whole different feel than the English translation. The English translation may seem more profound, but I think John included it because it gives us a good sense about how Christ felt about his life in a way that most of his words don't.

Everyone is talking time off to go to a festival. Even though most people are always up for a party, Christ still feels he has work to do (john 6:7). Beside, he say, the powers-that-be, up in Jerusalem doesn't give everyone else grief, but they give him grief because his job is criticizing them and what they do. SO Christ has better things to do right now,

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὑμεῖς "Ye" is from hymeis, which are the nominative form of the second person, "you."

ἀνάβητε (2nd pl aor imperat act) "Go...up" is from anabainô (anabaino), which means "go up", "mount", "shoot up" [of plants], "rise" [of rivers], "ascend to higher knowledge", "come to an end," and "turn out."

εἰς "Unto" is from eis (eis), which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν ἑορτήν: "This feast" is from heorte, which means "feast", "festival", "holiday," and generally, "holiday-making", "pastime," and "amusement."

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

οὔπω "Not..yet" is from oupo, which means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

ἀναβαίνω (1st sg pres ind act) "Go...up" is from anabaino, which means "go up", "mount", "shoot up" [of plants], "rise" [of rivers], "ascend to higher knowledge", "come to an end," and "turn out."

εἰς "Unto" is from eis (eis), which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

ἑορτὴν , "Feast" is from heorte, which means "feast,"festival", "holiday," and generally, "holiday-making", "pastime," and "amusement."

ταύτην "This" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

ὅτι "For" is from hoti (hoti), which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ἐμὸς "My" is from emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me."

καιρὸς "Time" is from kairos, which means "due measure", "proportion", "fitness", "exact time", "season", "opportunity", "time", "critical times", "advantage," and "profit." It is the concept of time as a moment as opposed to a measurement. The ideas of good times or bad times as a part seconds, minutes, and hours.

οὔπω "Not yet" is from oupo, which means "not yet" and a strong form of "not" and "not at all."

πεπλήρωται. (3rd sg perf ind mp) "Full come" is from pleroo which mean "to fill", "to fulfill", "to make complete", "to pay in full", "to make pregnant," and "to fill full."