Luke 12:24 Consider the ravens: for they neither sow nor reap;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Observe the ravens. Because the don't sow or mow. For them, there is not a storeroom nor storehouse. How much more important are you than the winged ones?

KJV : 

Luke 12:24 Consider the ravens: for they neither sow nor reap; which neither have storehouse nor barn; and God feedeth them: how much more are ye better than the fowls?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The version in Matthew 6:26 has a more obvious rhyme because the rhyming words are repeated three times instead of just two. This version seems more business-like. It may be that the birds that Jesus could see were ravens here, which is why he changed the verse. 

The word translated as "consider" primarily means "observe well" and "understand". This word is a very rare one for Jesus to use. This word is based on a root word that means "to understand" or "to perceive with the mind". It has a specific sense of coming to understand something. 

"The ravens" is from the noun means "raven". It is the basis for their scientific name, "Corvus corax".  This is the only time this word is used in the NT. 

The word translated as 'for" acts here as an adverb introducing a clause of explanation. In English, we would normally say "because".

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact.

The Greek word translated as "sow" means specifically to "sow seeds" and "to scatter" as in sowing seeds. Christ uses it to mean working today for a later reward.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact.

The Greek word translated as "reap" means "to do summer work" and "to reap." It is one of the two words used for collecting a harvest. The other word is used below.

The word translated as "which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. The form is an indirect object so "to which" or "for which".  It refers to the birds, but it is not the subject of the phrase. 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. When the verb "to be" appears before the subject, its sense can be "there is" or "there are". 

"Storehouse" is from the Greek word that means "treasury", "magazine", "storehouse", "store-room", "chamber," and "closet."

"Barn is a Greek noun that means "any place wherein to lay up a thing", "magazine", "storehouse", "burial-place", "refuge", "anything laid by", "store," and "store of favor."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God" or "the divine".  Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

The Greek word translated as "feedeth" has a number of uses in Greek, including many poetic ones, but it isn't a common word for "feed." It primarily means to "thicken and congeal a liquid," but it has a number of uses regarding rearing children and animals. The sense is to fatten them.

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

The adjective translated as "how much"  means "of what quantity," [in distance] "how far." [of number] how far," [of time] "how long," [of value] "how much", "how great", "how many," and "how much."

"More" is the comparative form of an adjective that means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."

The pronoun "ye" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

The Greek verb translated as "Are...better than" is another of those words that has a lot of meanings in Greek, but not many of them have the sense of "better than." Of the more central meanings, the one that fits bests might be "differ" or "make a difference," especially since the noun forms of the word primarily mean "difference."

The Greek word translated as "the fowls" is normally an adjective means "able to fly" and "winged," but it is used as a noun here, so "those able to fly" or "the winged ones". Christ always uses this word, not the normal Greek word that means "bird".

Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

κατανοήσατε  [uncommon](verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Consider" is from katanoeo, which means to "observe well", "understand", "apprehend", "perceive", "learn", "consider", "look at", "view", "to be in one's right mind," and "to be in one's senses."

τοὺς  κόρακας [unique](noun pl masc acc ) "The ravens" is korax, which means "raven", "Corvus corax". 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "For" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." 

οὐ (partic) "Neither" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

σπείρουσιν (3rd pl pres ind act) "They...sow" is from speiro, which means "to sow a seed", "to beget offspring", "to scatter like a seed," and "to sow a field."

οὐδὲ  (partic) "Nor" is from oude , which means "but not", "neither", "nor,"and "not even."

θερίζουσιν, (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Reap" is from therizo, which means "to do summer work", "to reap", "to mow", "to cut off," and, in some areas, "to plunder."

οἷς (pron pl masc dat) "Which" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. --

οὐκ (partic) "Neither" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. 

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Have" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ταμεῖον  (noun sg neut nom) "Storehouse" is from tameion, which means "treasury", "magazine", "storehouse", "store-room", "chamber," and "closet."

οὐδὲ (partic) "Nor" is from oude , which means "but not", "neither", "nor,"and "not even."

ποθήκη,  [uncommon] (noun sg fem nom) "Barn is from apothekewhich means "any place wherein to lay up a thing", "magazine", "storehouse", "burial-place", "refuge", "anything laid by", "store," and "store of favor."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

θεὸς (noun sg masc nom) "God" is theos, which means "God," "divine," and "Deity." 

τρέφει [uncommon](3rd sg pres ind act) "Feedeth" is from trepho, which means primarily, to "thicken or congeal [a liquid]", "cause to grow or increase", "bring up", "rear", "rear and keep [animals, slaves]", "tend", "cherish," "let grow (of parts of the body)", "cherish", "foster", "breed", "produce", "teem [of earth and sea]", "have within oneself", "contain", "maintain", "support," .Pass. "to be bred," and "reared."

αὐτούς: (adj pl neut acc) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

πόσῳ (adj sg masc dat) "How much" is from posos (posos), which means "of what quantity," [in distance] "how far." [of number] how far," [of time] "how long," [of value] "how much", "how great", "how many," and "how much."

μᾶλλον  (adv) "More" is from mallon, which is the comparative form of mala which means "very", "exceedingly", "more certainly", "especially," "more", "to a greater degree," and "rather."

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom ) "Ye" is from humeis, which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

διαφέρετε  [uncommon](2nd pl pres ind act) "Are...better than" is from diaphero, which means to "carry over or across", "carry from one to another", "go through life [of Time]", "bear through", "bear to the end", "go through with", "carry different ways", "spread...fame abroad", "tear asunder", "defer or reserve for judgment", "differ", "make the difference", "to be of importance", "have an interest at stake," "prevail", "quarrel", "struggle", "come between", "intervene," and, Pass. "be at variance and maintain on the contrary." quarrel." When uses as a noun, "that which makes a difference", "the difference," and "the odds.

τῶν πετεινῶν.  (adj pl masc gen) "The fowls" is from peteinon, which as an adjective means "able to fly", "full-fledged," and "winged," and, as a noun, "winged fowl," and "a bird."

Front Page Date: 

Apr 11 2018