Luke 12:50 But I have a baptism to be baptized with;

A continuation of the discussion about why they should be vigilant.

KJV

Luke 12:50 But I have a baptism to be baptized with; and how am I straitened till it be accomplished!

NIV

Luke 12:50 But I have a baptism to undergo, and what constraint I am under until it is completed!

LISTENERS HEARD

But I have a dunking to be dunked, and how depressed I am until that might be finished. 

LOST IN TRANSLATION

The verse starts humorously with Jesus saying, "I have a dunking to be dunked," because "baptism" didn't mean then what is means now. Here, it seems a metaphor for his death. It continues in a humorous way as he says, "how depressed I am." The word translated as "straightened" and "under constraint" also means "joined together."A point about his human and divine natures.  The punchline is also funny, meaning "to complete," "to accomplish," but also "to pay what is owed."

MY TAKE

We all get deperessed when we have to pay what is owed.

GREEK ORDER

βάπτισμα δὲ    ἔχω     βαπτισθῆναικαὶ  πῶς συνέχομαι          ἕως  ὅτου τελεσθῇ.
a dunkingBut I have  to be dunked, and how depressed I am until that   might be finished. 

 But I have a baptism(UW) to be baptized(UW) with(IW); and how am I straitened(CW) till it be accomplished(WF)!

  • UW --Untranslated Word -- The word "baptism" means "dunking." It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • UW --Untranslated Word -- The word "baptize" means "dunking." It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "with" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW --Confusing Word -- "Straigthened's" translation is more general than the word's more specific meaning.
  • WF -- Wrong Form  -- This verb is in the form of possibility, a subjunctive, which requires a "should" or "might" before the verb.
# NIV TRANSLATION ISSUES
9

But I have a baptism(UW)to undergo(WW,WV), and what(WW) constraint(WV,WF) I am under(IW) until it is completed (WF)!

 

  • UW --Untranslated Word -- The word "baptism" means "dunking." It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "undergo" should be something more like "dunked."
  • WV --Wrong Voice - The "undergo" here is translated as active but it is passive.
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "undergo" should be something more like "dunked."
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "what" should be something more like "dunked."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- "Constraint" translation is more general than the word's more specific meaning. This is not a noun but an verb.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  "Constraint" is not a noun but an verb.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "under" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF -- Wrong Form  -- This "completed is in the form of possibility, a subjunctive, which requires a "should" or "might" before the verb.
EACH WORD of KJV

 But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "yet," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

have -- The word translated as "have" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "keep close," "hold in," "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

baptism - - - (UW)The Greek noun for "baptism" appears for the first time in the NT. However, it comes from a Greek verb that means to "dip" or "to plunge" and was used for many different ideas ranging a town being "flooded" to a person being "drown" and from someone being "over their heads" in debt to "getting in deep water."  It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.

to -- This "to" is added to create the infinitive form of the following verb.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

baptized - (UW)The Greek word translated as "baptize" means "to dip," "to plunge," "to be drenched," "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."  It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.

with; -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

how -- "How" is the adverb that means "how," "by any means," and "I suppose." This is a common interrogatory pronoun used by Jesus.

am This helping verb "am" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

straitened - - (CW) "Straightened" is a Greek verb that means to be "joined together", to have shoulder "bent in or contracted" over the chest, and "to collapse". The general sense is to be constrained by being pressed upon. This translation is more general than the word's meaning.

till -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "till," "while," "as long as," "as far as," "up to the point," "in order that."  With the particle of possibility and the subjunctive form of the verb, the sense is until some unknown time.

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

missing "should" or "might"-- (WF) A helping verb is necessary because the following verb is a verb of possibility, a subjunctive, something that "should" or "might" occur.

accomplished!--  "Accomplished" is translated from a Greek word, which means "to complete" and "to accomplish," especially in the sense of having goal.  It also means "to bring to perfection."

EACH WORD of NIV

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but," "yet," "however," and "on the other hand." It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

have -- The word translated as "have" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "keep close," "hold in," "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

baptism- - (UW)The Greek noun for "baptism" appears for the first time in the NT. However, it comes from a Greek verb that means to "dip" or "to plunge" and was used for many different ideas ranging a town being "flooded" to a person being "drown" and from someone being "over their heads" in debt to "getting in deep water."  It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.

to -- This "to" is added to create the infinitive form of the following verb.

undergo,  - (WW, WV)   The Greek word translated as "undergo" means "to dip," "to plunge," "to be drenched," "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."  It is an untranslated Greek word adopted into English.This word doesn't mean "undergo." The verb here is translated as active but it is passive.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

what --  (WW) "What" is the adverb that means "how," "by any means," and "I suppose." This is a common interrogatory pronoun used by Jesus. This word doesn't mean "what." 

constraint (CW, WF)"Straightened" is a Greek verb that means to be "joined together", to have shoulder "bent in or contracted" over the chest, and "to collapse". The general sense is to be constrained by being pressed upon. This translation is more general than the word's meaning.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

am -- This helping verb "am" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

under -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

until -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "till," "while," "as long as," "as far as," "up to the point," "in order that."  With the particle of possibility and the subjunctive form of the verb, the sense is until some unknown time.

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

missing "should" or "might"-- (WF) A helping verb is necessary because the following verb is a verb of possibility, a subjunctive, something that "should" or "might" occur.

is -- This helping verb "am" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

completed! --  "Completed" is translated from a Greek word, which means "to complete" and "to accomplish," especially in the sense of having goal.  It also means "to bring to perfection." The form is the third-person, passive, past perfect, so "it has been accomplished."--

COMPARISON: GREEK to KJV

βάπτισμα [6 verses] (noun sg neut acc/nom) "Baptism" is baptisma, which is only in the New Testament and means "baptism. - - The Greek noun for "baptism" appears for the first time in the NT. However, it comes from a Greek verb that means to "dip" or "to plunge" and was used for many different ideas ranging a town being "flooded to a person being "drown" and from someone being "over their heads" in debt to "getting in deep water."  

δὲ [446 verses](conj) "But" is de which means "but," "yet," "however," and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be an explanation of an indirect cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). In an  "if" (εἰ) clause or temporal "when" (ὅταν) clause the sense is "if/when... then." In a series begun by men, it means "on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then." It can also be an explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").  When used with a conditional starting a clause, the sense is "if/when...then." When used with a particle meaning "indeed" the sense is "on one hand...on the other hand." In a listing, the sense is "then" or "yet." After an interruption, "so then."

ἔχω  [181 verses] (verb 1st sg pres ind/subj act) "I have" is echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to have due to one," "to maintain," "to hold fast," "to hold in," "to bear," "to carry," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." In aorist, it can mean "acquire," or "get." The main sense when it has an object is "to have" or "to hold." With a gen. object,  "to keep back" or "withhold" a thing.  The main sense when not having an object is "to hold" and "to keep." When its object is an infinitive verb, it means "to have the means or power," or "to be able" not "it must" as in English.  This verb isn't used to form past tenses as the helper verb does in English. Nor does it have the sense of "must" when used with infinitives.

βαπτισθῆναι, [8 verses] (verb aor inf pass) "To be baptized" is baptizo, which means "to dip," "to plunge," "to be drenched," "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water." 

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just." In a series, it can be translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as."

πῶς [36 verses](adv/pron indecl form) "How" is pos, which means "how," "how in the world," "how then," "in any way," "at all," "by any mean," "in a certain way,"and "I suppose."

συνέχομαι [1 verse](verb 1st sg pres ind mp) "am I straightened" is from sunecho, which means to be "joined together", to have shoulder "bent in or contracted" over the chest, and "to collapse". The general sense is to be constrained by being pressed upon.

ἕως [63 verses](conj) "While" is heos which means "until," "till," "while," "as long as," "up to the point," and "in order that" "as far as," and "up to the point that." Takes a genitive object.

ὅτου  [90 verses](pron sg masc/neut gen) Untranslated is hostis, which means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." -- "Which" is a pronoun that means "that," "anyone who," "anything which," "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." 

τελεσθῇ [5 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor subj pass contr) "Be accomplished"   is  teleo, which means "to complete", "to fulfill," and "to accomplish." It also means "to bring to perfection", "to pay what one owes," and "to execute a legal document." 

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