Luke 13:12 ​Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity.

Spoken to: 

an individual

Jesus sees a woman who is bent over.

KJV: 

Luke 13:12 ​Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity.

NIV : 

Luke 13:12 Woman, you are set free from your infirmity.”

LISTENERS HEARD: 

Woman, you have freed yourself of that weakness of yours. 

MY TAKE: 

We are healed by our trust in divine power.

GREEK (Each Word Explained Bottom of Page): 

GREEK ORDER: 

Γύναι,    ἀπολέλυσαι                         τῆς ἀσθενείας σου
Woman, you have freed yourself of that weakness of yours. 

LOST IN TRANSLATION: 

The "art loosed/are set free" is not the present tense, but the past present. The form could be passive as translated or it could also be the middle voice, the subject acting on themselves, "have freed yourself." This is more consistent with Jesus's statements about people's trust healing them.

# KJV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

2

​Woman, thou art(WT) loosed from thine (MWthe) infirmity.

  • WT - Wrong Tense - The "are" indicates the present tense but the tense is past perfect.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "infirmity" is not shown in the English translation. 

# NIV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

2

​Woman, you are(WT) set free from your (MWthe) infirmity.

  • WT - Wrong Tense - The "are" indicates the present tense but the tense is past perfect.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "infirmity" is not shown in the English translation. 

EACH WORD of KJV : 

​Woman, -- The word translated as "woman" is  the Greek word that means "woman (as opposed to man)," "wife," "spouse," "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)." It is closer to our "female."

thou -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

art -- (WT) This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb. This verb is in the past, perfect tense so "has" is correct. 

loosed -- The Greek verb translated as "thou art loosed" means "to loose from" "to set free," "to release," "to acquit,"  and "to divorce [a wife]." Its root is the word that means "untie" with the sense of "untie from," so our word "released."

from -- This word "from"  comes from the possessive form (genitive case) of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. However, it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. In reference to time, it could instead be translated as "during," "at," or "within." "From" works with this verb.

thine -- The word translated as "your" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form.  This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

infirmity. -- The Greek word translated as "infirmity" more generally means "weakness" and has the sense of a generally failing health rather than a specific disease or health problem.

EACH WORD of NIV : 

Woman, you set free from your infirmity.

​Woman, -- The word translated as "woman" is  the Greek word that means "woman (as opposed to man)," "wife," "spouse," "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)." It is closer to our "female."

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the verb.

are -- (WT) This helping verb indicates the present tense of the verb. This verb is in the past, perfect tense so "has" is correct. 

set free-- The Greek verb translated as "thou art loosed" means "to loose from" "to set free," "to release," "to acquit,"  and "to divorce [a wife]." Its root is the word that means "untie" with the sense of "untie from," so our word "released."

from -- This word "from"  comes from the possessive form (genitive case) of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession. However, it can also mean "belonging to," "part of," "which is," "than" (in comparisons), or  "for," "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. In reference to time, it could instead be translated as "during," "at," or "within." "From" works with this verb.

your -- The word translated as "your" is the genitive form of the singular, second-person pronoun, which is most commonly the possessive form.  This pronoun follows the noun so "of yours."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

infirmity. -- The Greek word translated as "infirmity" more generally means "weakness" and has the sense of a generally failing health rather than a specific disease or health problem.

COMPARISON: GREEK to KJV : 

Γύναι [28 verses](noun sg fem voc) "Woman" is gyne, which means "woman (as opposed to man)," "wife," "spouse," "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)."

ἀπολέλυσαι [13 verses](verb 2nd sg perf ind mp) "Thou art loosed" is apolyo. which means "to loose from" "to set free," "to release," "to acquit," "to divorce [a wife]," "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released," "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone."

τῆς [821 verses](article sg fem gen))  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). It usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. When not preceding a a word that can become a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."  -- 

ἀσθενείας  [2 verses]  (noun sg fem gen) "Infirmity." is from astheneia, which means "want of strength", "weakness", "disease", "sickness," [in a moral sense] "feebleness", "to be weak, feeble, or sickly", "to be too weak" [to do a thing], and "decline."

 

σου [144 verses](pron 2nd sg gen) "Thy" is sou is the genitive form of the second-person, singular pronoun that means "of you" and "your." As a genitive object of a preposition, as here, it means a movement away from something or a position away from something else.

Related Verses: 

Front Page Date: 

Aug 13 2024