Luke 13:33 Nevertheless I must walk to day, and to morrow,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Besides, it is necessary for me today and tomorrow and for the holding to convey myself because He doesn't approve luminaries to destroy themselves out of Jerusalem. 

KJV : 

Luke 13:33 Nevertheless I must walk to day, and to morrow, and the day following: for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There are several important ideas lost in translation including a humorous reference to the previous verse. One of the most important ideas is that prophets destroy themselves. A unique word is also used here just for fun. 

The word translated as "nevertheless" is a less common preposition used like a conjunction that means "except", "save", "besides," and "in addition to."

"I" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek but it is an object, "me". It is not the subject of the verb. 

The Greek verb translated as "must" is a special verb that means  "it is needful," and "there is a need." It is always singular referring to a specific moment in the past, present, or future. It works something like our word "must" but its form is fixed. The sense here is "it is necessary for me". 

The Greek verb translated as "walk" is the same verb translated as "go ye" in the previous verse, Luke 13:32. It means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." In these two verses, it works best as "convey" both in the sense of conveying yourself and conveying a message.  It is in a form that acts on itself, "convey myself" or "carry myself". This is in contrast to the Pharisees he is addressing who are being carried in Luke 13:32

 The Greek word translated as "to day" is an adverb that means "for today" and "on this day."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The term translated as "the morrow," may be the closest Greek comes to "tomorrow," but the form is an adverb. However, it is introduced by an article ("the") which allows it to act like a noun. The word is an adverb meaning something more like "until tomorrow", "until the morning" meaning "shortly" or "presently." Unlike the noun "tomorrow" in English, this adverb doesn't take in the entire future like we use "tomorrow" to mean "the future". This Greek word always communicates the idea of "in a short time." The term indicates not now but in the immediate future.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek verb translated as "the day following" means "to possess" or "to keep". It is used as a noun here. The sense is "the holding", which seems to refer to the time that Jesus has left. 

The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause. Our "because" works here. 

The Greek verb translated as "it can...be" means "take upon oneself", "accept", "admit", "approve",   "to be possible", and "it is allowed". The form is the third person so the sense is "it does not allow" or, more logically, "he does not allow". 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God", "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt. Christ uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople but their books in the OT. It is the verb that means "to shine before." Our word "luminaries" captures the idea very well. 

The word translated as "perish" means to destroy or demolish. The form is someone acting on themselves, so "destroy themselves. 

The word translated as "out of" means "out of a place" and "outside."

The word "Jerusalem" denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms of this word appear in the NT. This is the only time this form is used in Matthew. It is only used once in Mark, but not in Christ's words. It isn't used at all in John. This version is used most heavily in Luke, mostly in his narration, but a few times in Christ's words. It seems to be the more formally Greek version of the name.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "walk" means "convey" both in the sense of conveying yourself and conveying a message. It was used this way in the pervious verse as well. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

πλὴν (prep) "Nevertheless" is from plen, which is a preposition meaning "except", "save", "besides," and "in addition to." Often used with the negative as a conjunction, "except not." 

δεῖ (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "Must" is from, dei, which means "needful," and "there is need." 

με  (noun sg masc acc) "I" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

σήμερον (adv) "To day" is semeron, which is an adverb that means "for today" and "on this day."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αὔριον (adv) "To morrow" is from aurion, which means "tomorrow," "tomorrow at this time", and, as an adverb, "on the morrow", "till morning", "presently," and "shortly."  

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τῇ ἐχομένῃ (part sg pres mp fem dat ) "The day following" is echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to carry", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." 

πορεύεσθαι, (verb pres inf mp) "Walk" is poreuomai (poreuô) which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." It is almost always translated as "go" in the NT. -- The Greek verb translated as "go" isn't the most common verb translated as "go" in the NT but it is often translated that way. This word means "to lead over", "depart," and "to carry over." This word, however, uniquely means both "to pursue a course" and "to depart from life." Since it is in a form that acts on itself, the sense is "take yourselves". 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "For" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." 

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

ἐνδέχεται [unique](verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "It can...be" is endechomai, which means "take upon oneself", "accept", "admit", "approve",   "to be possible", and "it is allowed". 

προφήτην (noun sg masc acc) "The prophets" is prophetes, which means "one who speaks for a god and interprets his will", "interpreter", "keepers of the oracle", "the highest level of priesthood in Egypt", "interpreter," and "herald." It is a verb that means "to shine forth" It is a form of the verb, prophao. which means "to shine forth," or "to shine before." --

ἀπολέσθαι (verb aor inf mid) "Perish" is apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone." 

ἔξω(adv) "Out of" is exo, which means "out of a place", "outside", "external things," and "beyond a time."

Ἰερουσαλήμ. (Aramaic noun) "Jerusalem" is Ierousalemwhich is a form of word that denotes the city or its inhabitants. Two different forms, this form and Hierosolyma, appear in the NT. 

Front Page Date: 

Jun 8 2018