Luke 6:37 Judge not, and ye shall not be judged:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Also don't criticize, and you might never be criticized. Don't declare guilty and you might never be declared guilty. See free and you shall be set free. 

KJV : 

Luke 6:37 Judge not, and ye shall not be judged: condemn not, and ye shall not be condemned: forgive, and ye shall be forgiven:

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is much longer than the similar verse in Matthew (Matthew 7:1).  The word translated as "forgive" here is also a good example of how English translation is changed to conform to a certain set of ideas about what a line should say rather than what it does say. 

The Greek word translated as "and" throughout this verse is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

The terms used here for "judge" and "shall be judged" is a much more complicated idea. It primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings. Unlike most words, which Christ uses specifically, he uses this word in a variety of ways simply because no English word corresponds to it precisely. It can mean "judge", "criticize", "decide", "discriminate," and "separate," depending on the context. Since this is the first line in a new topic in his sermon, we have very little context. However, from the following text, the meaning seems to be more in the sense of "criticize". The form is either a command or a simple statement. 

The "and" conjunction is used again here. This is worthy of comment because in the parallel verse another word is used to make the final verb more of a consequence rather than something that happens in conjunction with something else. 

The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think" or "never". 

The "shall be judged" here is the same verb as above, but in the passive form. It isn't the future tense, but a form indicating something that might happen. 

The word translated as "condemn" and "ye shall...condemn" is a Greek verb that means "to give or get a judgment against," and "to pass a sentence." It refers almost exclusively to a legal decision. It is neither the word Christ commonly uses that gets translated as "condemn" nor the one he uses that gets translated as "judgment." Since this refers to legal decisions, "declare guilty" might work best in English. The first "condemn" is either a simple statement or a command. 

The "not" here is again both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think" or "never". 

The "ye shall...condemn" is not the future tense, but the form of something that might happen. 

The verb translated as "forgive" and "shall be forgiven" is not the verb that is almost always translated as "forgive" in the NT. Whenever you see a phrase translated as "forgive sins", it is never this verb (see the section on "forgive sins" in this article for more). 

The verb translated as "forgive" here is a verb that means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released." This is the verb that is used, for example, when Christ discusses divorce, that is, "cutting loose a wife". He also used it to refer to "letting loose" a crowd, which is translated as "send away". 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) Untranslated is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ  (partic) "Not" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -

κρίνετε, (2nd pl pres ind act or verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Judge" is from krino, which primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out", "to choose", "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate", "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

οὐ  μὴ (partic) "No" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -- The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

κριθῆτε: (verb 2nd pl aor subj pass) "Be judged" is from krino, which primarily means "to separate", "to put asunder," and "to distinguish." It has a lot of other secondary meanings, including "to pick out", "to choose", "to decide" disputes or accounts, "to win" a battle, "to judge" especially in the sense of "estimate", "to expound," or "to interpret" in a particular way.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. -

καταδικάζετε, (2nd pl pres ind act or verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Condemned" is katadikazô, which means "to give judgment against," "have judgment given in one's favor", "get a person condemned [to a payment] of money", "to pass a sentence," and "to condemn."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

οὐ  μὴ (partic) "No" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. 

καταδικασθῆτε. (verb 2nd pl aor subj pass) "Ye shall not be condemned" is katadikazô, which means "to give judgment against," "have judgment given in one's favor", "get a person condemned [to a payment] of money", "to pass a sentence," and "to condemn."

ἀπολύετε, (2nd pl pres ind act or verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Forgive" is from apolyo which means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released", "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone."

καὶ  (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀπολυθήσεσθε: (verb 2nd pl fut ind pass)  "Ye shall be forgiven" is  apolyo which means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released", "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone."

Front Page Date: 

Oct 9 2017