Mark 10:7 For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother...

KJV Verse: 

Mark 10:7 For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and cleave to his wife;

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

On account of this,he is going abandon, a man, that father of his and that mother.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This last clause here, "and cleave to his wife" doesn't exist in the Greek source we use today. Despite this, I notice that most Bibles retain it. The word translated as "leave" is not the common Greek word translated as "leave" or "depart." It is an uncommon word for Jesus, used only here and in the parallel in Matthew 19:5 that has the sense of abandon.

 

KJV Analysis: 

For -- The word translated as "for...cause" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

this -- "Of these" is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

cause -- The word translated as "for...cause" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

shall -- This is from the future tense of the verb.

a There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

leave -- "Leave" is from a verb that means "to be left", "left behind", "forsake", "abandon", "leave," and "remaining." It is not the verb that is used in the Gospels to mean "leave" in the sense of leaving a place." It is in the future tense.

his -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

untranslated --  The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

untranslated --  The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

mother, -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

and cleave to his wife; -- This clause doesn't exist in the Greek we use today. It was added in the Latin Vulgate.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἕνεκεν (prep) "For" is heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

τούτου ( adj sg masc gen ) "This" is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar."

καταλείψει  [uncommon](verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "Leave" is from kataleipo, which means "to be left", "left behind", "forsake", "abandon", "leave," and "remaining."

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "A man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

τὸν (article sg masc acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατέρα ( noun sg masc acc ) "Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὴν (article sg fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

μητέρα, ” (noun sg fem acc) "Mother" is meter, which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin."

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Jesus saw the relationship between a man and a woman as part of the process of growing up, that transfer of connection from the physical to the emotional and from ourselves to "the other." We share a common physical flesh with our mothers and fathers. Our relationship with our parents focuses on us. As children, the relationship is one-sided. We take and they give. They serve our needs: providing us with a home, love, and security.Loving them is loving ourselves since all we are, physically and psychologically, comes from them. Since ideally we have parents of both sexes, both boys and girls have an exact physical template in their parents for themselves.

When we marry, however, we move beyond the physical and beyond ourselves. Since our spouse is of another sex, a very different form of humanity, we move into a direct relationship with "the other." Since one of our parents is also of the opposite sex, they provide an outline for this relationship but they support us. In marriage, we reach our and personally support "the other," becoming a part of a new whole.This transformation is a worldly parallel of our embracing the Divine Other, God. In death, we move on from a marriage to the other sex and move to a marriage to the other Spirit. I find it particularly entertaining that the Greek word used for "wife" is used to distinguish between mortal women and goddesses.

Oct 1 2019