Mark 13:2 Do you see these great buildings?...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Do you see these, the mighty structures? No, it might not be left here, a stone upon a stone, that never might be torn down.

KJV : 

Mark 13:2 Seest thou these great buildings? there shall not be left one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The first statement is not addressed to the group but to one person. The second sentence seems to be the answer to a question that was not recorded. This verse contrasts strong negatives with verbs that only declare a possibility: what should or may happen, not what will happen. The structure of that statement is changed, making it seem more like a prophecy that it was. For prophecies, Jesus uses the future tense, but here he uses the form of possibility.

NIV : 

Mark 13:2 Do you see all these great buildings? Not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down.

NLT : 

Mark 13:2 Yes, look at these great buildings. But they will be completely demolished. Not one stone will be left on top of another!

Wordplay: 

Jesus creates some suspense in what might not be left thus but putting the subject in a phrase after the verb.

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Jesus is described as a carpenter, but he and his father were both builders, basically stone masons.  Jesus uses the basic Greek term for building, oikia, which means house, as a symbol for family and clan. Here the term used for building is a version of that word meant for bigger buildings, so a bigger clan, the Jewish nation.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Βλέπεις.( verb 2nd sg pres ind act ) "Seest thou" is from blepô (blepo), which means "to look" and "to see." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding.

ταύτας ( adj pl fem acc ) "These" is tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage.

τὰς (article pl fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

μεγάλας ( adj pl fem acc ) "Great" is from megas (megas), which means "big", "full grown", "great", "high", "loud", "mighty ""important," and "strong."

οἰκοδομάς; [unique]( noun pl fem acc )"Buildings" is oikodome, which is a shortened form of oikodomêna which means "building," and "structure."

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἀφεθῇ  ( verb 3rd sg aor subj pass ) "Be left" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

ὧδε  (adv) Untranslated is hode, the demonstrative adverb that means in manner, "in this wise," "thus," "so very", "so exceedingly," of Place, "hither," and "here."

λίθος (noun sg masc nom) "Stone" is lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones.

ἐπὶ  (prep) "Upon" epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

λίθον (noun sg masc acc) "Another" is lithos, which means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones, and altar stones. -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

ὃς ( pron sg masc nom ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐ μὴ (partic) "Not" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

καταλυθῇ [4 verses]( verb 3rd sg aor subj pass ) "Thrown down" is from katalyo, which means "put down", "destroy", "dissolve", "break up", "dismiss", "disband", "abolish", "bring to an end", "unloose," and "unyoke."

KJV Analysis: 

Seest -- The verb translated as "seest" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

thou -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the following verb.

these-- The "these" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. It is not typically used as an adjective.

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

great -- The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

buildings? -- "Buildings" is a noun that Jesus only uses here. It is a shortened form of a Greek word that means means "building," and "structure."

there -- (WW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "there" in the source. It is from a pronoun that means "what is present" or "here it is".

shall -- (CW) This helping verb does not indicate the future tense, but that the following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" phrase. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

left -- The word translated as "left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

one --  (WW)There is no Greek word that is translated as "one" in the source. However, these is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation. So instead of "one," this could be an "a."

stone -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

upon -- The word translated as "upon" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

another,  --  (WW) This is not the Greek word for another, but it is a repeat of the Greek word that means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

that -- The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

shall -- (CW) This helping verb does not indicate the future tense, but that the following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" phrase. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

not -- The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

thrown down. -- The verb "thrown down" is from the Greek word that means "to dissolve", "to disunite", "destroy", and "break up." It literally means "loosen down" or "break down" from the same root as the word Jesus uses to describe things "loose in heaven" and commandments being "broken." This word is used only four times by Jesus, three of them in this verse and its parallels in the other Gospels. The other time that he uses it he does so when he say that he has not come to "destroy" the law. So the sYes, look at these great buildings. But they will be completely demolished. Not one stone will be left on top of another!ense is "torn down."

KJV Translation Issues: 

6
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Inserted Word -- The word translated as "there" means "here."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" does not mean the future tense.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- There is no word translated as "one" but an "a"  could be used here.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "another" means "stone."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" does not mean the future tense.

NIV Analysis: 

Do  -- This helping verb is added to make this a question, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

you -- This is from the second-person, singular form of the following verb.

see -- The verb translated as "see" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

all -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "all" in the Greek source.

these-- The "these" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. It is not typically used as an adjective.

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

great -- The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

buildings? -- "Buildings" is a noun that Jesus only uses here. It is a shortened form of a Greek word that means means "building," and "structure."

Not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

one --  (WW)There is no Greek word that is translated as "one" in the source. However, these is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation. So instead of "one," this could be an "a."

stone -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

here --  "Here" is from a pronoun that means "what is present" or "here it is".

will -- (CW) This helping verb does not indicate the future tense, but that the following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" phrase. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

left -- The word translated as "left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

upon -- The word translated as "upon" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

another,  --  (WW) This is not the Greek word for another, but it is a repeat of the Greek word that means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

every one-- (WW) The word translated as "that" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

will -- (CW) This helping verb does not indicate the future tense, but that the following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" phrase. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

untranslated "never"-- (MW) The untranslated words  here are both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

thrown down. -- The verb "thrown down" is from the Greek word that means "to dissolve", "to disunite", "destroy", and "break up." It literally means "loosen down" or "break down" from the same root as the word Jesus uses to describe things "loose in heaven" and commandments being "broken." This word is used only four times by Jesus, three of them in this verse and its parallels in the other Gospels. The other time that he uses it he does so when he say that he has not come to "destroy" the law.

NIV Translation Issues: 

8
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "all" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- There is no word translated as "one" but an "a"  could be used here.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "will" does not mean the future tense.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "another" means "stone."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "every one" means "that."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "will" does not mean the future tense.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The negative "never" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

Yes, -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "yes" in the Greek source.

look at -- (WF) The verb translated as "see" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

these-- The "these" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. It is not typically used as an adjective.

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

great -- The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

buildings? -- "Buildings" is a noun that Jesus only uses here. It is a shortened form of a Greek word that means means "building," and "structure."

But -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "but" in the Greek source. The following clause comes at the end of the verse, not in the middle.

they -- (WW, WN) The word translated as "they" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause. It is not plural but singular.

will -- (CW) This helping verb does not indicate the future tense, but that the following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" phrase. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

untranslated "never"-- (MW) The untranslated words  here are both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

completely -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "completely" in the Greek source.

demolished.  -- The verb "thrown down" is from the Greek word that means "to dissolve", "to disunite", "destroy", and "break up." It literally means "loosen down" or "break down" from the same root as the word Jesus uses to describe things "loose in heaven" and commandments being "broken." This word is used only four times by Jesus, three of them in this verse and its parallels in the other Gospels. The other time that he uses it he does so when he say that he has not come to "destroy" the law.

Not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

one --  (WW)There is no Greek word that is translated as "one" in the source. However, these is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation. So instead of "one," this could be an "a."

stone -- The Greek word translated as "stone" means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

untranslated "here"-- (MW) The untranslated words "Here" is from a pronoun that means "what is present" or "here it is".

will -- (CW) This helping verb does not indicate the future tense, but that the following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" phrase. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

left -- The word translated as "left" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

on top of -- The word translated as "on top of" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

another,  --  (WW) This is not the Greek word for another, but it is a repeat of the Greek word that means "a stone", "stone as a substance," and various specific types of stones, such as touchstones and altar stones.

NLT Translation Issues: 

13
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "yes" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "look at" is not command but a statement, "do you see."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The article "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "but" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "they" means "that."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "they/that" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The adverb "here" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "will" does not mean the future tense.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The negative "never" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "completely" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- There is no word translated as "one" but an "a"  could be used here.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "will" does not mean the future tense.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "another" means "stone."

Front Page Date: 

Dec 9 2019