Mark 13:9 But take heed to yourselves: for they shall deliver you up to councils...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Watch them yourself, however! They are going to give up you for meetings and for assemblies.  You are going to be whipped also before leaders, kings. You are going to be stood up on account of me for  a testimony to them.

KJV : 

Mark 13:9 But take heed to yourselves: for they shall deliver you up to councils; and in the synagogues ye shall be beaten: and ye shall be brought before rulers and kings for my sake, for a testimony against them.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This initial "take heed/watch out" clause includes some unusual pronouns. Because information on the subject is part of the verb, subject pronouns, like the one here, are only needed to emphasize the subject, like saying "you yourselves" in English. There is also reflexive pronoun as its object translated as "to yourselves," in the KJV and ignored in the NIV and NLT.  The sense is a command "watch them yourselves."

The same Greek preposition is translated as "to," "in," and "for" in this verse in the KJV and in a similar variety in other versions. While the word can be translated as "into a place," the sense in all these phrases seems to be "for" (the purpose of).

The NIV and especially the NLT insert a lot of ideas that are not in the Greek, explaining the verse rather than translating it.

NIV : 

Mark 13:9 You must be on your guard. You will be handed over to the local councils and flogged in the synagogues. On account of me you will stand before governors and kings as witnesses to them.

NLT : 

Mark 13:9 When these things begin to happen, watch out! You will be handed over to the local councils and beaten in the synagogues. You will stand trial before governors and kings because you are my followers. But this will be your opportunity to tell them about me

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

βλέπετε ( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act ) "Take heed" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for."

δὲ (conj) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) Untranslated is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

ἑαυτούς: ( adj pl masc acc ) "To yourselves" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos. The second person form of the pronoun that Jesus uses is seatou.

παραδώσουσιν ( verb 3rd pl fut ind act ) "They shall deliver" is paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow."

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

συνέδρια ( noun pl neut acc ) "Councils" is synedrion, which means "council", "meeting", "councils of war," and "meeting room."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

συναγωγὰς (noun pl fem acc ) "Synagogues" is synagoge, which means a "bringing together", "assembly", "place of assembly", "contracting", "collection", "combination", "conclusion," and "demonstration." It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

δαρήσεσθε ( verb 2nd pl fut ind pass ) "Ye shall be beaten" is from dero, which means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐπὶ (prep) "Before" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

ἡγεμόνωνκαὶ [3 verses] ( noun pl masc gen ) "Rulers" is hegemon, which means "one who leads", "leader", "commander", "chief," and "one who does a thing first." The term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times.

βασιλέων ( noun pl masc gen ) "Kings" is basileus, which means a "king", "chief", "prince", "lord", "master", "a great man," and "the first and most distinguished of any class." It is a form of the word used for "kingdom."

σταθήσεσθε ( verb 2nd pl fut ind pass ) "Ye shall be brought" is histemi, which means "to make to stand", "to stand", "to set up", "to bring to a standstill", "to check", "to appoint", "to establish", "to fix by agreement", "to be placed", "to be set", "to stand still", "to stand firm", "to set upright", "to erected", "to arise," and "to place." 

ἕνεκεν (prep) "For sake" is heneka, which means "on account of", "as far as regards", "in consequence of," and "because."

ἐμοῦ (pron sg masc gen) "My" is emou, which means "me", and "mine".

εἰς (prep) "For" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

μαρτύριον [4 verses] ( noun sg neut acc ) "Testimony" is martyrion, which means "testimony," and proof."

αὐτοῖς. (adj pl masc dat) "To them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

KJV Analysis: 

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

take heed -- The verb translated as "take heed" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

untranslated "you" -- (MW) The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

to -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "to" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used. The form of the following pronoun does not call for it. It was added for clarity because the Greek itself doesn't quite work.

yourselves: -- (WF) "Yourselves" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on. It is plural masculine object but it must mean "themselves" because the form is wrong for "yourselves."

for -- (IW) There is no Greek word that is translated as "for" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

they -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

shall -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

deliver -- "Deliver" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that.

you -- The "you" here is plural, indicating it was addressed to a group of Christ's listeners as the object of the verb.  The fact this pronoun follows the verb, not the earlier plural reflexive pronoun is not its object.

up -- The form of the previous verb means "give over" but we usually say "give up" in English to capture the same idea.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.

councils; -- "Councils" is the generic Greek term for "council" or "meeting. It is the word that the name of the great Jewish council, the Sanhedrin was taken from. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

in -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.  This is the same preposition translated as "to" earlier.

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used, but articles are used more before plural nouns than in Greek.

synagogues -- The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

shall -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

beaten: -- The Greek verb translated as "beaten" means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash." Jesus seems to use it to mean being "flogged". 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

shall -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

brought -- (WW) The verb translated as "brought" means "to make stand", "to set up", "to establish and similar words. Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

before -- The word translated as "before" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

rulers -- "Rulers" is the Greek for a leader of any kind, but the term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times. This word is only used three times by Jesus. It is often translated as "governors" in the NT.

and -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "also" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

kings -- "King" is translated from a Greek word which means a "king" or "chief."

for -- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

sake, -- The word translated as "sake" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

for -- The word translated as "for" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.  This is the same preposition translated as "in" and "to" earlier.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

testimony -- "Testimony" is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was. This word is only used by Jesus four times.

against -- (WW) This word comes from the dative case of the following word(s) that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect. Translating it as "against" is an interpretation the part of the translators that isn't justified by the Greek.

them. -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The form is an indirect object.

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • MW - Missing Word -- The pronoun "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "to" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "yourselves" is not the second person but  third, "themselves." Nor is it a form that would requires a "to" in translation to English.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "for" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "brought" means "to make stand."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "against" means "to."

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

You -- The pronoun "you" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

must -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is a command.

be  -- (WW) The verb translated as "be" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

on your guard -- -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "on your guard" in the Greek source.

untranslated "themselves"-- (MW) The untranslated word "themselves" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on. It is plural masculine object but it must mean "themselves."

you -- (WF) The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.   The fact this pronoun follows the verb means that the plural reflexive pronoun is not its object. will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- (WF) This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive but it isn't.

handed over -- "Handed over" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.

the local -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "the local" in the Greek source.

councils; -- "Councils" is the generic Greek term for "council" or "meeting. It is the word that the name of the great Jewish council, the Sanhedrin was taken from. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

flogged -- The Greek verb translated as "beaten" means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash." Jesus seems to use it to mean being "flogged".

in -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.  This is the same preposition translated as "to" earlier.

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used, but articles are used more before plural nouns than in Greek.

synagogues -- The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

On-- This word comes from the genitive case of the following word(s) that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. In English, we use "on" with the following concept.

account , -- The word translated as "account" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

of me --  "Of me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

stand -- The verb translated as "stand" means "to make stand", "to set up", "to establish and similar words. Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

before -- The word translated as "before" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

governor -- "governors" is the Greek for a leader of any kind, but the term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times. This word is only used three times by Jesus. It is often translated as "governors" in the NT.

and -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "also" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

kings -- "King" is translated from a Greek word which means a "king" or "chief."

as -- The word translated as "for" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.  This is the same preposition translated as "in" and "to" earlier.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

witness -- "Witness " is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was. This word is only used by Jesus four times.

to -- This word comes from the dative case of the following word(s) that requires the addition of a preposition in English: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect. Translating it as "against" is an interpretation the part of the translators that isn't justified by the Greek.

them. -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The form is an indirect object.

NIV Translation Issues: 

6
  • MW - Missing Word -- The conjunction "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be" means "see."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "on your guard" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" indicates a passive verb, but the verb is not passive.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "the local" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The conjunction "and" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

When these things begin to happen, - -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "when these things begin to happen, " in the Greek source.

watch out!   The verb translated as "watch out" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

untranslated "themselves"-- (MW) The untranslated word "themselves" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on. It is plural masculine object but it must mean "themselves."

you -- (WF) The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.   The fact this pronoun follows the verb means that the plural reflexive pronoun is not its object.

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

be -- (WF) This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive but it isn't.

handed over -- "Handed over" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that.

to -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.

the local -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "the local" in the Greek source.

councils; -- "Councils" is the generic Greek term for "council" or "meeting. It is the word that the name of the great Jewish council, the Sanhedrin was taken from. 

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

beaten-- The Greek verb translated as "beaten" means "to flay" or "to skin" someone, though in later use it came to mean "to cudgel" or "to thrash." Jesus seems to use it to mean being "flogged".

in -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.  This is the same preposition translated as "to" earlier.

the -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "the" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used, but articles are used more before plural nouns than in Greek.

synagogues -- The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the following verb.

will -- This helping verb indicates that the following verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

stand -- The verb translated as "stand" means "to make stand", "to set up", "to establish and similar words. Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

trial -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "trial" in the Greek source.

before -- The word translated as "before" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

governor -- "governors" is the Greek for a leader of any kind, but the term was specifically used for the governors of provinces in Roman times. This word is only used three times by Jesus. It is often translated as "governors" in the NT.

and -- There is no Greek word that is translated as "also" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

kings -- "King" is translated from a Greek word which means a "king" or "chief."

because  -- The word translated as "account" means "on account of", "because," and "in consequence of."

you are -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "you are" in the Greek source.

my --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

followers. But this will be your opportunity -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "followers but this will be your opportunity" in the Greek source.

to tell -- (WF) "To tell" is the Greek word "testimony" or "proof." From the word martys, source of our word 'martyr', which means "witness." Obvious from the meaning of "martyr" today what the initial fate of such witnesses was. This word is only used by Jesus four times.

them. -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The form is an indirect object.

about -- (WW) The word translated as "about" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure, and "for" a purpose.  This is the same preposition translated as "in" and "to" earlier.

me -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "me" in the Greek source.

NLT Translation Issues: 

14
  • MW - Missing Word -- The conjunction "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "when these things begin to happen, " doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The pronoun "themselves" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "you" indicates an object, not a subject.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "be" indicates a passive verb, but the verb is active.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "the local " doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The conjunction "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "trial" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "you are " doesn't exist in the source.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "followers but this will be your opportunity" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "to tell" is not a verb but a noun, "witness."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "about" means "into."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "the local" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "me" doesn't exist in the source.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

This verse describes two venues that Jesus sees very differently. Notice, when brought before the groups (councils and synagogues), no one has a chance: they are just punished. However when brought before individuals, kings and commanders, the apostles can defend themselves, giving testimony to what they know. Christ sees group relationships as inherently corrupt by social pressures.

Only in one-on-one relationships, can we make a really, human connection, even if we are talking to kinds and rulers.

Front Page Date: 

Dec 14 2019