Mark 13:37 And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

What, however, do I say to you?  To everyone I say, wake up!

KJV : 

Mark 13:37  And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is clearly humorous in the way Jesus repeats himself to set up the punchline. It doesn't change what he has been saying, but it says it in a more light-hearted way.

NIV : 

Mark 13:37  What I say to you, I say to everyone: ‘Watch!’ ”

NLT : 

Mark 13:37  I say to you what I say to everyone: Watch for him!”

Greek Vocabulary: 

( pron sg neut nom/acc) "What" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δὲ (conj/adv) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I say" is lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command." --

πᾶσιν ( adj pl masc dat ) "Unto all" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." --

λέγω, (1st sg pres ind act) "I say" is lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command." --

γρηγορεῖτε. (2nd pl pres imperat act) "Watch" is from gregoreo, which means "to become fully awake," and "to watch." --

KJV Analysis: 

And -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "and" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It is translated to "and" in the KJV because the translators saw no opposition to the previous statement of Jesus. My assumption is that something that was said that was not recorded that Jesus is countering.

what -- The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

you -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc.  Jesus almost always uses this word after the verb, "I say" above. Here he uses it before the verb to draw attention to it.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It is repeated here, which is odd since Jesus uses this word a lot but this is the only place it is repeated in a clause. The point is that he isn't just saying that to those present.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

all, -- The word translated as "unto all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. The "unto" comes from its indirect object form. Again, this comes before the verb. The reason for this word is to clarify that he is not just speaking to the people present but to all people hearing his words.

Watch. -- "Watch" is from a Greek verb that means "to be or to become fully awake." It is in the form of a command. As a command, "Wake up!" would be more on point. This command has been repeated in several verses at the end of this chapter.

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" means "but" or "however." This is not the adverbial form.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It is translated to "and" in the KJV because the translators saw no opposition to the previous statement of Jesus. My assumption is that something that was said that was not recorded that Jesus is countering.

What -- The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

you -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc.  Jesus almost always uses this word after the verb, "I say" above. Here he uses it before the verb to draw attention to it.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It is repeated here, which is odd since Jesus uses this word a lot but this is the only place it is repeated in a clause. The point is that he isn't just saying that to those present.

to -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

everyone , -- The word translated as "everyone" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. The "unto" comes from its indirect object form. Again, this comes before the verb. The reason for this word is to clarify that he is not just speaking to the people present but to all people hearing his words.

Watch. -- "Watch" is from a Greek verb that means "to be or to become fully awake." It is in the form of a command. As a command, "Wake up!" would be more on point. This command has been repeated in several verses at the end of this chapter.

NIV Translation Issues: 

1
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  It is translated to "and" in the KJV because the translators saw no opposition to the previous statement of Jesus. My assumption is that something that was said that was not recorded that Jesus is countering.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

you -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc.  Jesus almost always uses this word after the verb, "I say" above. Here he uses it before the verb to draw attention to it.

what -- The word translated as "what" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

say -- The word translated as "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It is repeated here, which is odd since Jesus uses this word a lot but this is the only place it is repeated in a clause. The point is that he isn't just saying that to those present.

to -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

everyone , -- The word translated as "everyone" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. The "unto" comes from its indirect object form. Again, this comes before the verb. The reason for this word is to clarify that he is not just speaking to the people present but to all people hearing his words.

Watch. -- "Watch" is from a Greek verb that means "to be or to become fully awake." It is in the form of a command. As a command, "Wake up!" would be more on point. This command has been repeated in several verses at the end of this chapter.

for him - (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "for him" in the Greek source

NLT Translation Issues: 

2
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "for him" doesn't exist in the source.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 11 2020