Mark 3:27 No man can enter into a strong man's house...

Greek Verse: 

Literal Translation: 

Still no, he has not the power, no one, into the house of the strong entering, those vessels of his to spoil, if not first the strong he might bind and then the house of his he might spoil.

KJV Verse: 

Mar 3:27 No man can enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he will first bind the strong man; and then he will spoil his house.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The first two words in this verse are not translated. The words used here for "strong man," "goods," and "spoil" are all uncommon, used primarily in this verse and its parallels in the other Gospels. The "house" here is a metaphor for a mind. This is clearer in the Greek because the word translated as "enter" is a word that has the specific meaning of "enter into mind." Though the connection to the previous verses on "Satan" isn't clear, the general topic has been "evil spirits" all along. Here, Jesus returns to the topic of "house" that Jesus uses as a metaphor for the mind in which an "unclean spirit" dwells (Matthew 12:44).Since we have minds, we are a house of these "demons" (see this article on these Greek words)."   In modern terms, this means non-physical things that are real:  ideas, information, and other mental constructs. If our conscious minds are strong, we can protect our private fief of interior mental territory. The term translated as "bind" here is the same word that Jesus uses to refer to things being "bound" in heaven if bound on earth.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀλλ (adv) Untranslated is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

οὐ (partic) Untranslated is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

δύναται ( verb 3rd sg pres ind mp ) "Can" is from the verb, dunamai (dunamai) which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

οὐδεὶς ( adj sg masc nom ) "No man" is from oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὴν  ( article sg fem acc ) Untranslated  is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. 

οἰκίαν ( noun sg fem acc ) "House" is from oikia (oikia), which means "building", "house", "family," and "household."

τοῦ ( article sg masc gen ) Untranslated  is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

ἰσχυροῦ  [uncommon] (noun sg masc gen ) "A strong man" is ischuros, which means "strong", "mighty," and "powerful." It is from ischus, meaning strength. Here is seems as though it is used to refer to demons that control people.

εἰσελθὼν  [uncommon] (part sg aor act masc nom ) "Enter" is from eiserchomai (eiserchomai)which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office, ""to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

τὰ σκεύη ( noun pl neut acc ) "Goods" is skeuos (skeuos)which means "a vessel", "an implement", "a piece of equipment", "household furnishing," and "an inanimate object."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" ( is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." --

διαρπάσαι [uncommon]( verb aor inf act ) "Spoil" is from diarpazô (diarpazo), which means "to tear into pieces", "to efface", "to spoil," and "to plunder."

ἐὰν (conj) "Except" is ean, (with me below) which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. --

μὴ (partic) "Except" is me , (with ean above) which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

πρῶτον ( adj sg masc acc ) "First" is protos. In place, this means "before", "in front," and, as a noun, "the foremost." Of time, it means "former", "earlier," and, as a noun, "the initial." In order, it means "the first." In math, it means the prime numbers. Of rank or degree, it means "superior" or, as a noun, "the highest" or "the best." --

τὸν ἰσχυρὸν (noun sg masc gen ) "The strong man" is ischuros (ischuros), which means "strong", "mighty," and "powerful." It is from ischus, meaning strength. Here is seems as though it is used to refer to demons that control people.

δήσῃ(verb 3rd sg aor subj act) "Bind" is deô (deo) which means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. "

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

τότε (adv) "Then" is tote, which means "at that time" and "then." -

τὴν ( article sg fem acc ) Untranslated  is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

οἰκίαν ( noun sg fem acc ) "House" is from oikia (oikia), which means "building", "house", "family," and "household."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

διαρπάσει. [uncommon]( verb 3rd sg aor subj act ) "Spoil" is from diarpazô (diarpazo), which means "to tear into pieces", "to efface", "to spoil," and "to plunder."

KJV Analysis: 

untranslated The Greek word usually translated as "but" that denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise." This word is let untranslated because the translators could see the diea that Jesus was opposing. That idea was likely in a question that Jesus was answering.

untranslated The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea. The subjective negative is used later in the verse. 

No man The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

can The word translated as "can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. A better translation is "has the power." The verb is modifies in an infinitive, which is the verb "to spoil" here, not the "enter."

enter "Enter" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."  It is an infinitive, that is, "to enter into".  This is not an active verb. It is in the form of an adjective, "entering."  This is NOT what no one has the power to do. This describes the "no one," "no one entering."

into The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

a The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, not the indefinite one, "a." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

strong man's: "A strong man" is an uncommon word for Jesus to use that means "strong", "mighty," and "powerful."  The article before it makes it act like a noun. The "man" comes from the fact it is masculine. The word "man" is not used or necessary. The possessive form comes from the case of the noun, which follows the word "house."

house, The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. We might say "estate" in English to capture this idea.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

spoil "Spoil" is from another uncommon word for Jesus to use. It means "to tear into pieces", "to efface", "to spoil," and "to plunder." This verb is an infinitive, what the "has the power" refers to.

his  The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective.

goods, "Goods" is another uncommon noun for Jesus. It  means "a vessel", "an implement", "a piece of equipment", "household furnishing," and "an inanimate object." The reference here is to the mind as a "vessel" for thought. It is plural.

except Except is from two Greek words that mean "if not." The Greek word meaning "if " indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when". The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

he From the singular form of the verb translated as "bind" below.

will  From the form of the verb "bind" below, but the verb is not the future tense. It is a tense that indicates something happening at a specific point in time, past, present, or future. The subjunctive from of the verb suggests a "might" would be more appropriate.

first The word translated as "first" takes a lot of different types of "first" meanings from its context. Here, it is technically an adjective but it plays the role of the English adverb "initially."

bind "Bind" is an adjective form for a verb that means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. " The verb is a subjunctive, indicating something that might happen.

the strong man "A strong man" is an uncommon word for Jesus to use that means "strong", "mighty," and "powerful."  The article before it makes it act like a noun. The "man" comes from the fact it is masculine. The word "man" is not used or necessary.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). I

then The Greek word for "then" means "at this time" or "then". 

he  From the singular form of the verb translated as "spoil" below.

will From the future tense of the verb "spoil" below,

spoil "Spoil" is from another uncommon word for Jesus to use. It means "to tear into pieces", "to efface", "to spoil," and "to plunder." The "he" is from the The "will" is from the future tense of the verb.

his  The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

house. The Greek word translated as "house," refers to the building itself, all the people that dwell in it, including slaves and servants, all property owned by that family, and all the descendants of the continued line. We might say "estate" in English to capture this idea.

Wordplay: 

The house here is a metaphor for mind and the word "enter" used has the double meaning of "enter into mind."

Related Verses: 

Front Page Date: 

Jun 5 2019