Mark 3:24 And if a kingdom be divided against itself,

KJV Verse: 

Mark 3:24 And if a kingdom be divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And if possibly a realm against itself is divided,no it doesn't have the power to be stood up that realm there.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The form of this if/then statement expresses something that is always true. The general discussion is about the nature of power of suffering. In Greek, the word translated as "kingdom" describes a realm controlled by one entity, a kingdom or ruler. Like "kingdom" the word is from the root word "king."  The word does not refer to a group  or nation of people, as we might read it today. This statement is a play on the nature of that concept. For a realm to be divided against itself, the ruler must be divided against himself. The word "stand" is passive, "be made to stand." However, that word doesn't specifically mean stand on two legs but it is a more general concept with a lot of meaings like our "set up."

KJV Analysis: 

And The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

if The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when". The specific word here partially determines what kind of conditional statement this is.

a kingdom The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will. The "a" comes from the fact there is no article "the."

be divided "Be divided" is from an uncommon noun, which means "divide", "distribute", "assign", "sever", "cut-off," (passive) "to be divided", "to be dispersed," and "to be reckoned a part." Jesus only uses this word in this and parallel phrases and two others referring to satanas's realm that is, suffering's domain.

against The word translated as "against" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

itself, "Itself" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on.

that The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

kingdom The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will. It includes that article so "the kingdom."

can- The word translated as "can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.  This is the active verb in the sentence.

not The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

stand. The verb translated as "stand" means "to make stand", "to set up", "to establish and similar words. The form is a passive infinitive, "be made to stand." Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

ἐὰν (conj) "If" is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom) "Kingdom" is from basileia (basileia), which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

ἐφ᾽ (prep) "Against" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against." -- The word translated as "unto" means "against", "before", "during", "by" or "on."

ἑαυτὴν (adj sg fem acc) "Itself" is from heautouis a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself", "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

μερισθῇ,  [uncommon](verb 3rd sg aor subj pass) "Be divided" is from merizo, which means "divide", "distribute", "assign", "sever", "cut-off," (passive) "to be divided", "to be dispersed," and "to be reckoned a part."

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

δύναται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough." - The word translated as "I can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates ability or power.

σταθῆναι (verb aor inf pass) "Stand" is from histêmi (histemi), which means "to make to stand", "to stand", "to set up", "to bring to a standstill", "to check", "to appoint", "to establish", "to fix by agreement", "to be placed", "to be set", "to stand still", "to stand firm", "to set upright", "to erected", "to arise," and "to place." Like the English words "put" and "set," it has a number of specific meanings from "to put down [in writing]", "to bury", "to establish", "to make", "to cause," and "to assign."

βασιλεία (noun sg fem nom) "Kingdom" is from basileia (basileia), which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

ἐκείνη: (adj sg fem nom) "He" is ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." -- The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

Related Verses: 

Jun 2 2019