Mark 9:41 For whosoever shall give you a cup of water to drink in my name...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Who, consequently, when he might give drink to you  a cup of water in name because of anointed you are, truly I tell that never might he destroy that compensation of his.

KJV : 

Mark 9:41 For whosoever shall give you a cup of water to drink in my name, because ye belong to Christ, verily I say unto you, he shall not lose his reward.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Notice that Jesus does not say that we earn compensation by giving a cup of water but that that compensation might not be destroyed. Notice that Jesus doesn't really say "you belong to Christ" in the Greek. There is no verb meaning "belong." He says, "of anointed you are," When Jesus refers to "the Chrsit," he uses the article, "the" to change the adjective into a noun. Here, there is no "the," so anointed is an adjective. In Greek, a name is an idea of the person, but not the real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative. However, Jesus doesn't say "my name." There is no "my" in the Greek. The word translated as "lose" usually means "destroy."

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὃς (pro ) "Whosoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

ἂν  (conj) Untranslated is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might), which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

ποτίσῃ -- ( verb 3rd sg aor subj act )  "Give to drink" is potizo, which means "to give a drink", "to water", "to moisten," and metaphorically "to saturate one's mind."

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ποτήριον ( noun sg neut acc ) "Cup" is poterion, which means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple.

ὕδατος "Water" is from hydor, which means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ὀνόματι () "Name" is onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative.

ὅτι (adv/conj) "Because" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

Χριστοῦ ( adj sg masc gen ) "Christ" is christos, which means "to be rubber with salve", "used as an ointment," and, of persons, "anointed."

ἐστέ, ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "You belong" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ἀμὴν () "Verily" is amen, which is the Hebrew, meaning "truly", "of a truth," and "so be it." It has no history in Greek of this meaning before the NT. However, this is also the infinitive form of the Greek verb amao, which means "to reap" or "to cut."

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I tell" is lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelled the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ὅτι (adv/conj) Untraslated is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

οὐ μὴ (partic) "Not" is ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἀπολέσῃ ( verb 3rd sg aor subj act ) "He shall...lose" is apollymi, which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone."

τὸν (article) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

μισθὸν () "Reward" is misthos, which means "wages" in the sense of compensation for work done, "pay", "hire", "fee", "recompense," and "reward."

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

KJV Analysis: 

For --The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why." However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "consequently" or "as a cause". 

whosoever -- The word translated as "whosoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

untranslated -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

shall -- This shall comes from the form of the verb, but it doesn't indicate the future tense, but the mood of possibility.

give -- This is not the common Greek word translated as "give" but a part of the verb that means "give to drink."

you -- The "you" here is the second-person, plural pronoun in the form of an object.  

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

cup -- The word for "of the cup" means "a drinking-cup", "a wine-cup", "a jar," and "a receptacle" for offerings in the temple. The cup is used by Jesus as a symbol for sharing burdens. ]

of -- This is from the form of the following noun.

water -- "Water" is the noun that means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts),  "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

to drink -- The "give..to drink" is a verb that means "to give a drink", "to water", "to moisten," and metaphorically "to saturate one's mind". This is the word used for watering livestock.  The root word meaning "to drink" has a double meaning of "to celebrate". 

in -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

my -- There is no "my" in the Greek.

name, -- The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

because -- The word translated as "because" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

ye -- This is from the second-person plural form of the verb.

belong -- The verb "belong" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

to -- The form of the following word requires that addition of a preposition in English to capture its meaning.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

Christ, --- The word translated as "Christ" means "anointed." When Jesus uses it to mean the Messiah, he puts and the article "the" before the adjective changing it into a noun. There is no "the" used here. Even if the word was a noun and not an adjective, the sense would be "an anounted."

verily -- The word translated as "verily" is the Hebrew word that means "truly" or "certainly," but it sounds like the Greek word with the same meaning. In Greek, the word also means "to reap." The "verily" phrase is used frequently by Jesus as a personal signature. Its vocabulary and meaning are discussed in detail in this article.

I -- This is not the pronoun but it comes form the first person form of the verb.

say -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This comes from the form of the following pronoun.

you,  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

he -- This is from the third-person singular form of the verb.

shall -- This "shall" also comes from the form of the verb, and agin, it doesn't indicate the future tense, but the mood of possibility.

not -- The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

lose -- The word translated as "lose" means to destroy or demolish.

his -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

reward. -- The Greek word translated as "reward" really means "compensation," what you receive for doing work. In Christ's teaching, there is spiritual compensation and worldly compensation.

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

This brings the idea of a spiritual reward or, more precisely, compensation or wages, into this chapter's on-going discussion of the difference between the spiritual and temporal world. Because Jesus has been describing how things are reversed in the spiritual world. In society, we receive compensation for work, but in the spiritual world we have already received everything, including our lives. By doing good, we do not earn more, but we do not destry what we have. By doing what is worthless, we do destroy what we have.

But names as our thoughts or ideas of a person have more power in the spiritual realm. Remember how Christ cast our a spirit earlier in the chapter? The spirit was dumb and deaf so its had no name and couldn't be caste out unless the person was more in touch with the spiritual through prayer and fasting. In Mar 5:9, we see the contrasting situation. Christ ask for the spirit's name before commanding it.

Front Page Date: 

Sep 18 2019