Mark 14:13...Go ye into the city, and there shall meet you a man

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Depart into the city, and he is going to meet you, a man, a jar of water lifting up. Follow him.

KJV : 

Mark 14:13...Go ye into the city, and there shall meet you a man bearing a pitcher of water: follow him.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Despite the uncommon words in this verse, the Greek here is very simple. One of those uncommon words is the very, very common verb that means "to meet." This verse is a shortened version of Luke 22:10. The key and uncommon words are the both Gospels. As usual with verses that don't involve teaching, there is nothing we could call wordplay in this verse. 

Both  the KJV and the NLT versions of this verse insert words into it. However, the NIV translation translates every word, adding nothing.

NIV : 

Mark 14:13...Go into the city, and a man carrying a jar of water will meet you. Follow him.

NLT : 

Mark 14:13...As you go into the city, a man carrying a pitcher of water will meet you. Follow him.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὑπάγετε ( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act or  verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Go ye" is hupago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you." --

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὴν (article) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πόλιν, ( noun sg fem acc ) "The city" is polis, which means "city", "citadel", "one's city", "one's country", "community", "state", "state affairs," and "civic duties." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἀπαντήσει  [2 verses]( verb 3rd sg fut ind act ) "Shall meet" is apantaowhich means to "come or go to meet", "meet", "encounter" of a heavenly body, "meet", "agree to", "occur to one", and "fall in with".

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. --

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "A man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

κεράμιον [2 verses]( noun sg neut acc ) "A pitcher" is  keramion, which means an "earthenware vessel" and "jar."

ὕδατος ( noun sg neut gen ) "Of water" is from hudôr (hydor), which means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters. --

βαστάζων:  [6 verses]( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Bearing" is from bastazo, which means "to lift up", "to raise", "to bear", "to carry", "to endure," and "to carry off, "produce", "yield," of land."

ἀκολουθήσατε ( verb 2nd pl aor imperat act ) "Follow" is akoloutheo, which means "to follow," and "to go with." It also means "to be guided by" and means following a leader as a disciple.

αὐτῷ, (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

KJV Analysis: 

Go -- "Go" is a Greek verbal verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." The form is a command.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the previous verb.  In English, commands do not usually need pronouns.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

city, The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today. However, in this case, it means Jerusalem.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

there -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "there" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the following verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

meet -- "Meet" is a verb that Jesus only uses here and in Luke version. It means to " meet face to face", "encounter", "meet with", and "come in contact with".  It is from a root that is frequently used that means "gather". The form gives it a third person masculine subject, so "he will meet you" or "he is going to meet". 

you -- The "you" here is plural, indirect object.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- The Greek word for "a man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

bearing -- "Bearing" is from a verb that means to "lift up" "raise", "endure," and "bear." It is in the form of an adjective, "lifting up" or "bearing."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

pitcher -- "Pitcher" is an uncommon word that means an "earthenware vessel" and "jar."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

water: -- The Greek word translated as "of water" means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

follow -- The term "follow" means "to follow," or "go with," in a physical sense, but it is also a metaphor meaning "to be guided by" or "to follow the meaning of."  The form is a command.

him. -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "there" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.

NIV Analysis: 

As you go into the city, a man carrying a pitcher of water will meet you. Follow him.

Go -- "Go" is a Greek verbal verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." The form is a command.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

city, The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today. However, in this case, it means Jerusalem.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- The Greek word for "a man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

carrying -- "Carrying" is from a verb that means to "lift up" "raise", "endure," and "bear." It is in the form of an adjective, "lifting up" or "bearing."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

jar -- "Jar" is an uncommon word that means an "earthenware vessel" and "jar."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

water: -- The Greek word translated as "of water" means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the following verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

meet -- "Meet" is a verb that Jesus only uses here and in Luke version. It means to " meet face to face", "encounter", "meet with", and "come in contact with".  It is from a root that is frequently used that means "gather". The form gives it a third person masculine subject, so "he will meet you" or "he is going to meet". 

you -- The "you" here is plural, indirect object.

follow -- The term "follow" means "to follow," or "go with," in a physical sense, but it is also a metaphor meaning "to be guided by" or "to follow the meaning of."  The form is a command.

him. -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

NIV Translation Issues: 

0

NLT Analysis: 

As -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "as" in the source we use today nor was there one in the source that the KJV translators used.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the previous verb.  In English, commands do not usually need pronouns.

go  -- (WM)  "Go" is a Greek verbal verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart." The form could be a command or a simple statement. The fact it begins the verse indicates that it is a command.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

city, The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today. However, in this case, it means Jerusalem.

untranslated -- (MW) The untranslated Greek word "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- The Greek word for "a man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples".

carrying -- "Carrying" is from a verb that means to "lift up" "raise", "endure," and "bear." It is in the form of an adjective, "lifting up" or "bearing."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

pitcher -- "Pitcher" is an uncommon word that means an "earthenware vessel" and "jar."

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

water: -- The Greek word translated as "of water" means "water", "spring water", "drinking water", "rain water", "rain", "time running out" (from the water clocks used in courts), "liquid," the constellation Aquarius, the winter solstice, and a place with mineral waters.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the following verb is the future tense or a form that indicates possibility at some time. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

meet -- "Meet" is a verb that Jesus only uses here and in Luke version. It means to " meet face to face", "encounter", "meet with", and "come in contact with".  It is from a root that is frequently used that means "gather". The form gives it a third person masculine subject, so "he will meet you" or "he is going to meet". 

you -- The "you" here is plural, indirect object.

Follow -- The term "follow" means "to follow," or "go with," in a physical sense, but it is also a metaphor meaning "to be guided by" or "to follow the meaning of."  The form is a command.

him. -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

NLT Translation Issues: 

3
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "as" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • WM  - Wrong Mood  - The verb "go" is translated as a statement, and the word form could be a command or a statement but the fact that it begins the sentence makes it appear to be a command.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The conjunction "and" is not shown in the English translation.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 16 2020