Matthew 10:36 And a man's foes shall be those

Greek : 

Matthew 10:36  "καὶ ἐχθροὶ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου οἱ οἰκιακοὶ αὐτοῦ.”

Micah 7:6 (LXX 1:6) ... ἐχθροὶ ἀνδρὸς πάντες οἱ ἄνδρες οἱ ἐν τῷ οἴκῳ αὐτοῦ

Literal Verse: 

Also, haters of this man? Those belonging to that house of his!

KJV : 

Matthew 10:36 And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is a the end of the quote from the Greek Septuagint of Micah 7:6 that began in the previous verse. However, Jesus changes this verse even more dramatically, replacing both the word for "man" and the phrase meaning  "the ones of a household."

There is no verb in this sentence, in either Jesus's version or the one in teh Septuagint.  However, in Greek the verb "to be" is implied when there are two words in the form of a subject that can be equated. However, even in English these connections can also be made in verbal statements in English. See this article on the difference between written and spoken language.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:36  a man’s enemies will be the members of his own household.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:36 Your enemies will be right in your own household!

Wordplay: 

 The phrase "a man's foes" also means "mankind's enemies" and "the haters of humanity." 
 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐχθροὶ (adj pl masc nom ) "Enemy" is from echthros, which means "the hated", "the hateful", "the hostile", "the enemy", "the alienated," and "the hating."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen)  "A" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) ​"A man's" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

οἰκιακοὶ (adj pl masc nom​) "Of...household" is from oikiakos, which means "of a house", "belonging to a house," and "member of one's household."

αὐτοῦ.” (adj sg masc gen​) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

KJV Analysis: 

And -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and" connecting this phrase to the previous verb.

a -- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man's The Greek word for "a man's" in the singular possessive form of the word for "man," but it also means a "person" and, generally, "mankind" and "humanity". The form is genitive which is the form of the Greek possessive.

foes -- The word translated as "foes" primarily means "the hated", "the hateful," and "the hating." It is an adjective used as a noun. The use of this word is very specific in Greek literature. It describes one who was a friend, but who as been alienated and refuses to be reconciled. It is usually translated as "enemy" in the KJV.

shall be -- (CW) There is no verb "is" in the Greek source. It is implied by the equating of "foes" with "they," where are both in the Greek form of subjects.  However, there is nothing here suggesting the future tense.

they -- (WW) The word translated as "they" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here, it is before the adjective, "of the household."  It is not the pronoun "they." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

of -- This is from the meaning of the adjective.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

own -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "own" in the Greek source. There is a special pronoun in Greek that means something like "his own" but it isn't used here.

household. -- "Of...household" is from a Greek word that means "one of a household" or' in the plural, "those of a household". Households in Christ's time were not the temporary associations that they are today. It was the family you were born into, but it was broader than a family since it included everyone that worked together--masters and servants--in the family business. It combined our idea of a family with its idea of a lifelong association with a small business where people were not necessarily related.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "the."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- Though an "is" is implied by the form noun and adjective, it doesn't exist and cannot be the future tense, "shall be."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "they" should be "the ones" or "those."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "own" doesn't exist in the source.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and" connecting this phrase to the previous verb.

a -- (WW) The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man's The Greek word for "a man's" in the singular possessive form of the word for "man," but it also means a "person" and, generally, "mankind" and "humanity". The form is genitive which is the form of the Greek possessive.

enemies -- The word translated as "enemies " primarily means "the hated", "the hateful," and "the hating." It is an adjective used as a noun. The use of this word is very specific in Greek literature. It describes one who was a friend, but who as been alienated and refuses to be reconciled. It is usually translated as "enemy" in the KJV.

will be -- (CW) There is no verb "is" in the Greek source. It is implied by the equating of "foes" with "they," where are both in the Greek form of subjects.  However, there is nothing here suggesting the future tense.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here, it is before the adjective, "of the household."  It is not the pronoun "they." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

members of -- This is from the meaning of the adjective.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

own -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "own" in the Greek source. There is a special pronoun in Greek that means something like "his own" but it isn't used here.

household. -- "Of...household" is from a Greek word that means "one of a household" or' in the plural, "those of a household". Households in Christ's time were not the temporary associations that they are today. It was the family you were born into, but it was broader than a family since it included everyone that worked together--masters and servants--in the family business. It combined our idea of a family with its idea of a lifelong association with a small business where people were not necessarily related.

NIV Translation Issues: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "the."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- Though an "is" is implied by the form noun and adjective, it doesn't exist and cannot be the future tense, "will be."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "own" doesn't exist in the source.

NLT Analysis: 

untranslated "and"-- (MW) The untranslated word "and" is used as the conjunction "and" connecting this phrase to the previous verb.

Your -- (WW) The word translated as "your" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "man's"-- (MW) The untranslated word is singular possessive form of the word for "man," but it also means a "person" and, generally, "mankind" and "humanity". The form is genitive which is the form of the Greek possessive.

enemies -- The word translated as "enemies " primarily means "the hated", "the hateful," and "the hating." It is an adjective used as a noun. The use of this word is very specific in Greek literature. It describes one who was a friend, but who as been alienated and refuses to be reconciled. It is usually translated as "enemy" in the KJV.

will be -- (CW) There is no verb "is" in the Greek source. It is implied by the equating of "foes" with "they," where are both in the Greek form of subjects.  However, there is nothing here suggesting the future tense.

right in -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "right in" in the Greek source.

untranslated "the"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article, "the,"  which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here, it is before the adjective, "of the household."  It is not the pronoun "they." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

your -- (WW) The word translated as "your " is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, "his."  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." This pronoun follows the noun so "of his."

own -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "own" in the Greek source. There is a special pronoun in Greek that means something like "his own" but it isn't used here.

household. -- "Household" is from a Greek word that means "one of a household" or' in the plural, "those of a household". Households in Christ's time were not the temporary associations that they are today. It was the family you were born into, but it was broader than a family since it included everyone that worked together--masters and servants--in the family business. It combined our idea of a family with its idea of a lifelong association with a small business where people were not necessarily related.

NLT Translation Issues: 

7
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "and" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated "your" should be "the."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "man's" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- Though an "is" is implied by the form noun and adjective, it doesn't exist and cannot be the future tense, "will be."
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "right in" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated "his" should be "the."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "own" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“Also, the haters of the man?” The teacher continued. “Those belonging to that household of his!”
This idea was not taken well by many in the crowd.
“But blood has always been more important than any religious sect,” Labbah, Thaddos’s father argued. “My household and I against our cousins. My cousins and I against our sect. My sect and I against the other sects.”
“But this teaching is different,” a woman said. She was a wealthy supporter of the Nazarene, the wife of a man who managed a rich, famous person’s estate. She has requested that her name not be used here. “My husband and I have to keep our beliefs secret from the rest of our household.”

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Mar 28 2020