Matthew 13:41 The Son of man shall send forth his angels,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The child of humanity is going to dispatch his envoys and they are going to bring together outside his kingdom all the traps and the ones creating anarchy.

KJV : 

Mat 13:41 The Son of man shall send forth his angels, and they shall gather out of his kingdom all things that offend, and them which do iniquity;

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word translated as "son" more generally means "child."

The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in plural.

The "shall send forth" here is from a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle."

The word translated as "angels" means "messengers" or "envoys."It did not convey our concept of "angels" to anyone hearing Christ speak, which was neither a Greek nor Jewish concept but comes from Zoroastrianism.

The word translated as "they shall gather" specifically means collecting something for use. The word means a selective choosing. In the previous verse, "picking" worked better because we were talking about crops, but here "collecting" might fit the context better.

The Greek preposition translated as "out of" means "out of" when referring to motion, but "beyond", "outside of", "beyond" when referring to place as it does here.

The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

The word translated as "all things" is an adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. It is in a form that modifies the follow word that means "trap" and "snare."

The word translated as "that offend" is not a verb, but a noun that means a "trap" or "snare" for an enemy.

The Greek word translated as "them which do" is a verb meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "rendering" as service. It is in the form of a noun or adjective.

The term translated as "iniquity" is literally "the condition of being without law.' In English, the term for this is "anarchy," which comes from the same Greek word, an, which means "without." It also means being in contempt or violation of the law, that idea of lawlessness.


Wordplay: 

Related Verses: 

Mat 13:40 As therefore the weeds are gathered

More about related verses in this article: The End of the World?

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀποστελεῖ (verb 3rd sg fut ind act ) "Shall send forth" is from apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch."

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom/gen) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child."

τοῦ ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

τοὺς ἀγγέλους (noun pl masc/fem acc) "Angels" is from aggelos, (aggelos) which means "messenger" and "envoy."

αὐτοῦ, "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

συλλέξουσιν (verb 3rd pl fut ind act) "They shall gather" is from sulego, a term meaning "gather", "collect", "come together", "collect", "get together [people]", "picking (fruit)", "compose", "compile", "scrape together", "compile a list of," (in middle passive) "collect for oneself", "for one's own use," and (in passive) "come together", "become customary", "come together", "assemble." --

ἐκ "Out of" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τῆς βασιλείας (noun sg fem gen) "The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." -

πάντα (adj pl neut nom/acc/voc) "All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τὰ σκάνδαλα (noun pl neut nom/acc) "That offends" is from skandalon, which means a "trap" or "snare" for an enemy. It is not Greek, but based on the Hebrew and Aramaic word. This is one of the words that first occurs in the Greek version of the Old Testament from the Hebrew word for "noose" or "snare."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τοὺς ποιοῦντας (part pl pres act masc acc) "Them which do" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

τὴν ἀνομίαν,”(noun sg fem acc) "Inequity" is from anomia, which means "lawless", "lawless conduct," and "the negation of law."