Matthew 13:51 Have you understood all these things?

KJV Verse: 

Mat 13:51 Have ye understood all these things?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Have you put together all these (six analogies of the kingdom of the heavens).

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Would you be surprised if the word translated as "understood" means something much more interesting in the larger context of the six parables this section of Matthew relates?

"Have you understood" is from a Greek verb which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive", "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out. This verb has been used six times in this section, starting with the verse where Christ explains that he speaks in analogies (Mat 13:13) for a reasons, and ending in Mat 13:23 , where Christ explains the "good seed" bringing together his words.

The word translated as "all" means "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas.

The "these things" is from a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage. In this context, "these" refers to the parables he has just relayed

Christ is asking if we can put together all these six analogies for the kingdom of heaven. In these analogies, the kingdom of heaven is described as "a man who sows good seed", "a mustard seed", "leaven", "a treasure hidden in a field," a trader," and "a net." How do you fit these analogies all together as the afterlife or final judgment? These parables "fit together" if they are evaluated in light of the consistent way Christ uses his metaphors.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Συνήκατε ( verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Have ye understood" is from suniêmi (syniemi) which means "to bring together" or "to set together." It is also a metaphor for "perceive", "hear," and "understand" as we would say that we "put it all together" when figuring something out.

ταῦτα (pl neut acc ) "These things" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

πάντα" (adj pl neut acc) All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

λέγουσιν αὐτῷ Ναί.

Wordplay: 

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