Matthew 18:24 And when he had begun to reckon,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Of his first, However, one, a debtor of an immense sum of money, was presented to him.

KJV : 

Mat 18:24 And when he had begun to reckon, one was brought unto him, which owed him ten thousand talents.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The general idea is captured by the KJV, but very few of its words are from the Greek.

This verse is translated in the KJV in the context of the previous verse. However, that translation is an attempt to fit the words to the context rather than a direct translation.

The Greek word translated as "and" joins phrases in an adversarial way and it is usually translated as "but." Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

There is no Greek word in the source that you could translate as "when". It was added by the KJV translators to make their English phrasing work.

The word translated as "he" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it is not the subject of the sentence. It is the possessive form ("his" matching the form of the following verb used as an adjective.

"Had begun" is from a verb in the form of an adjective that means "to be first", "to begin," and "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command." It is in the possessive form agreeing with the pronoun above.

"To reckon" is from a verb that means "gather in a harvest", "raise or use in helping," and "take part in a thing." In the previous KJV verse, it was translated as "take" with another word that does mean "reckoning," (normally translated as "word"). That word does not appear in this verse.

"One" is from the noun that means "one" and "single." As in English, it means a single person. This word is in the same form as the word "debtor" below. Together they act as the subject of the sentence.

"Was brought" is from a passive form of the verb that means "to bring to, " "to bring upon," "to present", "to offer", "to declare," and "to lead to."

The word for "which owed" means "debtor" or "under a bond. In Christ's era, a person under a bond was almost a slave until the debt was paid.

The word translated as "ten thousand" is primarily used generally to express immense and even infinite amounts. It is not from the Greek numbers for "ten thousand," but it came to means that as a definate number.

The word translated as "talents" is not the word for any specific amount of money, but the word that means "weight", "a pair of scales," and "sum of money."

Wordplay: 

The "ten thousand talents" here is expresse in exagerated language, that could even mean "an infinite weight" of money. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀρξαμένου (part sg aor mid masc gen) "Had begun" is from archomai, which is a form of archô, which means "to be first", "to begin", "to make a beginning", "to rule", "to govern," and "to command."

δὲ "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "He" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

συναίρειν (verb pres inf act) "To reckon" is from synairo, which means "take up together", "gather in a harvest", "collected", "take part in a thing", "help in bearing or undertaking," "raise or use in helping," "help", "assist," and "annul jointly with another."

προσήχθη (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Was brought" is from prosphero, which means "to bring to, " "to bring upon", "to apply to," [without dat] "to apply, use, or use", "to add to", "to present", "to offer", "to address [proposals]", "to convey [property]", "to contribute", "to pay", "to be carried towards [passive]", "to attack", "to assault", "to go toward", "to deal with", "to take [food or drink]," to exhibit", "to declare," and "to lead to."

εἷς (noun sg masc nom) "One" is from heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ὀφειλέτης (noun sg masc nom) "Which owed" is from opheiletes, which means "a debtor", "a person who owes a debt" or "one who is under a bond."

μυρίων ( adj pl masc gen) "Ten thousand" is from myrios, which means (of Number) "numberless", "countless", "infinite," (of Size) "measureless", "immense", "infinite," (of time) "incessant," (as a definate number)"ten thousand," and as an Adv. "immensely", "incessantly." It is not from the Greek numbers (10-theka, 1,000=chilia).

ταλάντων. "Talent" is from talanton, which means "a weight", "a pair of scales", "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortuns of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

The Spoken Version: 

However, one of his first, a debtor of an immense sum of money, was presented to him.