Matthew 19:12 For there are some eunuchs,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

As there are sexless who are from a belly of a mother born in this way. And there are sexless who been made sexless by the men. And there are being made sexless themselves through the realm of the sky.

Having the power to contain, let him contain.
OR
Let he who has himself the ability to make room [for another], let him make room.

KJV : 

Mat 19:12 For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from [their] mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive [it], let him receive [it].

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Christ offers only one alternative to marriage, abstaining from sex, however, the term here doesn't describe this as a passive, inactive role.

The word translated as "for" can be treated as supporting a dependent clause, or, in written English, as "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

The word eunuch means literally a "bed watcher," which refers to the role of castrated men guarding sleeping women. It, however, doesn't mean physically castrated as much as "sexless." On the humorous side, it refers to dates "without stones."

The word translated as "womb" means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb, meaning any hollow within the body. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "were made eunuchs" is from a verb formed from the noun for "eunuch." This word is only used here in the testament, where is it used not once, but twice in this verse. It is like someone today might make up the word "eunuchized." The form here is passive, "were eunuchized" or "were made sexless".

The word translated as "of", when used with a passive verb,indicates a cause with passive verbs, "by," or "under control of."

The Greek word for "men" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The "have made...eunuchs" is the "eunuchize" verb again, but here it is in the form of an adjective, eunuchizing. However, this verb is a little strange in Greek because though it refers to eunuchs doing this to themselves, the verb isn't in that form, possibly because when it comes to making up verbs, this form was a bridge too far.

The word translated as "through" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." It is not the word that is ever used to say "for the sake" of something. Here the "by a cause" used seems the most obvious.

There "kingdom of heaven" here is literally "the realm of then heavens" where heaven is plural. More about this common phrase in this article.

"He that is able" is from another verb, here in the form of a noun. The verb means "having the power or ability" to do something. It is often translated as "can" in the NT. It is in the form of someone acting on themselves, "the one being able himself."

The last phrase has two very different meanings and it is a classical example of Christ's wordplay.

The repetition of "receive" is from the repetition of the same verb in two different forms, but that word has three meanings none of them really "receive." It means 1) having the capacity to contain something, 2) making progress, and 3) making way or room for someone or something else. In English, we have not similar combination of ideas in one word so we have to focus on one or the other of this word's meanings to translate it. The term is the basis for "choreograph," that is, planning out a dance.

Note: Christ says that people can abstain from sex either because they are born disinterested in sex, because they are castrated by others, or because they are able to control themselves but only by heaven's power. None of these states are controlled by ones own power. However, the final like is different, specifically saying what people have the power within themselves to do. This seems to indicate the "make room for another" interpretation AND to contain themselves to the degree they have no need to divorce their wives, the larger topic here.

The bottom line is that, yes, marriage is difficult, but we can "contain ourselves" and "make room for another" if we give ourselves the power. The alternative, that is, "bed watching," is only possible by powers outside of ourselves. As Christ started by saying, men and women were created to be together. This is our nature no matter how difficult it is to stay together. Making room for another is difficult and doesn't get any easier by changing partners.

In reading this verse, Christ may be referring here to gay people. Christ might be saying that some people are born without an interest in the opposite sex as well as being made that way by men or by heaven. After all, how many people are born without sex organs entirely? Not many. However, if this does refer to gay people, the message is clear that those people should abstain from sex. It certainly isn't that they should marry people of the same sex, which goes against the message of the entire series of verses, which is about making room "for the other."

Wordplay: 

 The made up word for "eunuchified" is used instead of the common Greek words for "to castrate."

The word translated as "receive" means both "to contain" and "to make room for another." The last line can have both meanings at once when referring to staying married. We must both make room for another and contain ourselves. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

εἰσὶν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "There are" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

γὰρ "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

εὐνοῦχοι (noun pl masc nom) "Eunuchs" is from eunouchos, which "castrated person", "eunuch, and "(of dates) without stones." It means literally "bed watcher," that is, acting as a chamberlain, referring to the fact that castrated men were used as guards for woman's bedrooms.

οἵτινες (pron pl masc nom) "Which" is from hostis, which means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

ἐκ "From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

κοιλίας (noun sg fem gen) "Womb" is from the Greek, koilia, which means the "cavity within the body" (from the Greek, koilos, for "hollow"). It means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

μητρὸς (noun sg fem gen) "Mother" is from mêtêr (meter), which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin."

ἐγεννήθησαν (verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Born" is from gennaô (gennao), which means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", "to create," and "to engender." This is the causal form of gignomai, which is translated as "done" in the NT, but which comes closer in meaning to "become."

οὕτως, (adv) "Were so" is from houtos, which means as an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰσὶν(verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "There are" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

εὐνοῦχοι(noun pl masc nom) "Eunuchs" is from eunouchos, which means literally "bed watcher," that is, acting as a chamberlain, referring to the fact that castrated men were used as guards for woman's bedrooms.

οἵτινες (pron pl masc nom) "Which" is from hostis, which means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."

εὐνουχίσθησαν (verb 3rd pl aor ind pass) "Made eunuchs" is from a verb form of the word for eunuchs, eunouchizô, that is taken to mean "castrate," but which is only used here in the NT. The normal words for referring to castration are anorchos (without testicles), or alithos (without stones).

ὑπὸ "Of" is from hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)", "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by", "under," or "with", "under the cover or protection of", "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate", "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection", "control", "dependence," of Time, "in the course of", "during", "about," as an adverb, "under", "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by", "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause).

τῶν ἀνθρώπων, (noun pl masc gen) "Men" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰσὶν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "There are" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

εὐνούχισαν (part sg aor act neut nom) "Made eunuchs" is from a verb form of the word for eunuchs, eunouchizô, that is taken to mean "castrate," but which is only used here in the NT.

ἑαυτοὺς (adj pl masc acc) "Themselves" is from heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

διὰ (prep) "For" is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between."

τὴν βασιλείαν (noun sg fem acc) "The kingdom" is from basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

τῶν οὐρανῶν. (noun pl masc gen) "Of Heaven" is from the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate." -

δυνάμενος (part sg pres mp masc nom) "He that is able" is from the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

χωρεῖν (verb pres inf act) "To receive" is from choreo, which means "to leave room for another", "to make way", "to withdraw", "to go forward", "to make progress", "to advance", "to proceed," [of money] "to be spent", "to have room for", "to hold", "to contain," and "to be capable of."

χωρείτω. (verb 3rd sg pres imperat act) "Let him receive is from choreo, which means "to leave room for another", "to make way", "to withdraw", "to go forward", "to make progress", "to advance", "to proceed," [of money] "to be spent", "to have room for", "to hold", "to contain," and "to be capable of."

The Spoken Version: 

This is because there are the sexless born from their mother's womb. Also, there are also the sexless who are made sexless by men, and the sexless who make themselves sexless by the realm beyond earth.

He that can himself make room for another, make room. Let him who can contain himself, contain.