Matthew 5:32...That whoever shall put away his wife,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, adultery and sacrifice, vows and vow breaking

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I myself, however, am telling you that everyone loosening that woman of his outside of a reason of cheating makes her to be betrayed. [Also who, when having been diverosedhe might marry her having been loosened, betrays himself.]

KJV : 

Matthew 5:32 But I say unto you, That whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: and whosoever shall marry her that is divorced committeth adultery.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is the first appears of the Greek word usually translated as "word," -- as in the word made flesh---that doesn't actually mean word. The Greek actually means "logic," "ideas," and, in this case, "reason."  In Greek, the is another word that means "word." This word can be a "discussion" or even "saying," but seldom a single "word."  Yet it is translated as "word" 216 times in the but the KJV. That translation is preferred largely for poetic reasons. However, using that translation makes it difficult to understand what Jesus is actually saying in verses like this. See this article for more.

The word translated as "fornication/sexual immorality" primarily means "prostitution" when applied to women, but it is also a metaphor for idolatry. Even the ancients Greeks thought of indulging in sexual immorality as a form of worshiping a false god (and they had many gods). There are dozens of other words for sexual activity in Greek, including much more specific terms for various sexual acts such as intercourse or fornication. In the Greek Old Testament, Jeremiah 3:8 uses this word and the word translated here as "committing adultery" in its discussion of God divorcing Israel for the immorality of worshipping idols.

The last part of this verse is shown in brackets because it does not appear in all of the earlier manuscripts.

NIV : 

Matthew 5:32  But I tell you that anyone who divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, makes her the victim of adultery, and anyone who marries a divorced woman commits adultery.

NLT : 

Matthew 5:32 But I say that a man who divorces his wife, unless she has been unfaithful, causes her to commit adultery. And anyone who marries a divorced woman also commits adultery.

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "fornication" means both sexual immorality and worshipping false gods. 

My Takeaway: 

Legal documentation doesn't make a broken promises any less of a tragedy.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγὼ (pron 1st sg nom) "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

δὲ (partic) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "Say" is from llego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) You" is from humas and humon, which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

πᾶς (adj sg masc nom) Untranslated is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything."

(article masc sg nom) "Whoever" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἀπολύων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Shall put away" might be  apolyo which means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released", "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone."

τὴν (article sg fem acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

γυναῖκα (noun sg fem acc) "Wife" is from gyne, which means "woman (as opposed to man)", "wife", "spouse", "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

παρεκτὸς (παρέξ) [unique](adv ) "Saving" is parektos, which means "out beside," "besides," "except," "exclusive of," "beside" or "except." The correct Greek spelling, pares, does appear thirteen times though it is not defined in Strong's.  The word means literally "from the outside."

λόγου (noun sg masc gen) "For the cause" is logos, which means "word", "computation", "reckoning", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," and "value."

πορνείας (noun sg fem gen) "Fornication" is porneia which means "prostitution" for a woman and "fornication" for a man. It is a metaphor for idolatry.

ποιεῖ (3rd sg pres ind act) "Causeth" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

αὐτὴν (pron sg fem acc) "Her" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

μοιχευθῆναι (aor inf pass) "Commit adultery" is from moicheuo, which means "commit adultery with a woman, " "to debauch a woman," and generally, "to commit adultery with anyone." It is a metaphor for "worshiping idolatrously."

[καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whoever" is from hos, which is the demonstrative pronoun in its various forms (hê, ho, gen. hou, hês, hou, etc. ; dat. pl. hois, hais, hois, etc. gen. hoou). It means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

ἐὰν (conj) Untranslated is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if)and an (might)) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event.

ἀπολελυμένην (part sg perf mp fem acc) "Her that is divorced" is apolyo which means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit", "to divorce [a wife]", "to do away with," and "to begin to count." In the passive, it means "to be released", "to be separated [combatants]," "to be brought forth [a child]," and "to be delivered [of a mother]," and "to be undone."

γαμήσῃ (3rd sg aor subj act) "Shall marry" is from gameo, which mean "to marry", "to take a woman," or "to have sexual intercourse." For a woman, it means "to give yourself in marriage." It can also mean to "take a lover."

μοιχᾶται]. ( 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Committeth adultery" is from moicheuo, which means "commit adultery with a woman, " "to debauch a woman," and generally, "to commit adultery with anyone." It is a metaphor for "worshiping idolatrously."

KJV Analysis: 

But -- The term translated as "but" means that, but since it always appears in the second position in a phrase, it feels more like our word "however," which can appear in the second position. The effect is to change the direction of the phrase after it is started.

I -- (MW) The pronoun is used here explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since this information is already in the verb, the sense is repetitive as we say "I myself."

say -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

That -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

untranslated "all"-- (OS) The untranslated word "all", "whole", or "every" appears her in the sources we use today. The sense is "every" to the following word meaning "one".

whoever -- The word translated as "whosoever" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The sense here is "one" to the above "every".

untranslated "when"-- (MW) The untranslated word "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when". -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

shall  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "shall" in the Greek source.

put away -- (WW) The Greek verb translated as "put away" means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]".  It is not the future tense, but the aorist which can refer to past, present, or future but indicates a specific point in time. This is not the usual Greek word for divorce. See  Matthew 5:31 for more about this use of this word.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

wife,-- The word translated as "wife" is the general word for "woman." However, saying "his woman" in Greek has the same general meaning as referring to a wife.

saving -- The Greek word translated as "saving" means "out beside," "besides," "except," "exclusive of," "beside" or "except." Jesus only uses this word here. This form is not used outside of the Bible and one other Greek document referencing the Bible. It also does not appear in the Septuagint, the Greek OT. The word means literally "from the outside."

for the cause -- (WW) "For the cause" is from logos, which is the Greek word normally translated as "word" in the Gospels. This verse is a good example of the fact that it doesn't really mean "word". The word primarily means "calculation", "reason" and "reckoning." It is the word from which we get our word "logic." Jesus uses it in the way we use "concept", "idea" and, here, "reason". More about this word in this article.

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession/

fornication,The word translated as "fornication" usually means "prostitution" when applied to a woman. The original Greek concept includes adultery but also includes other forms of sexual immorality, including homosexuality, incest, prostitution, and so on. This Greek word is the root for the English word, "pornography." The English word "debauchery" captures many aspects of this word. It is also a synonym for idolatry, worshiping idols. This connects the worship of false gods with sexual immorality.

causeth -- The word translated as "causeth" is almost always translated as "do" in the Gospels. However, this verse is a good example of why it should usually be translated according to its primary meaning which is more the sense of "make", "produce," "perform," and "create."

her  -- The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

commit adultery:-- The verb translated as "to commit adultery" is narrowly defined as sex with another's wife. A married man having sex with an unmarried woman was not considered adultery. However, sex with a married woman by anyone not her husband was considered adultery by both the woman and the man, punishable by death and considered one of the chief crimes along with idolatry and murder. It is not an active verb here, but it is a passive verb. Christ uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray" or, in the passive, "to become betrayed". In English, we would simplify the phrase, "makes her become betrayed" more simply as "betrays her".

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

whosoever -- The word translated as "whosoever" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The sense here is "one" to the above "every".

shall -- (CW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

marry -- The "shall marry" means "marry" but it also means having sexual intercourse generally. It means "to take a woman" or "to take a lover." It is not the future tense, but a form that indicated something that might happen, which is indicated by the introductory "if".

her -- This English objective pronoun is added and not in the Greek source.   In Greek, pronoun objects are not repeated after each verb because they are implied by their first occurrence.

that is -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "that is" in the Greek source.

divorced  (WW, WF) The Greek verb translated as "divorced  " means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]".  The word is an participle as an adjective modifying the subject of the sentence. It is passive and the past perfect tense so "having been loosened."

committeth adultery. -- (WV) The verb translated as "to commit adultery" is narrowly defined as sex with another's wife.  Jesus uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray" or "defile." However, the form is either passive, "is defiled," or, more likely, "defiles himself."

KJV Translation Issues: 

11
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word  "all" or "ever" exist the Greek source we used today.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "shall" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "put away" should be "loosen" or "free."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "wife" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "for the cause" should be "reason."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" does not mean the future tense.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "divorced" should be "loosened" or "freed."
  • WF - Wrong Form -- The verb "divorced" is a passive, past perfect participle, so "having been divorced."
  •  WV - Wrong Voice -  The "committeth adultery" is either passive or the middle voice "is defiled," or, more likely, "defiles himself."

NIV Analysis: 

But -- The term translated as "but" means that, but since it always appears in the second position in a phrase, it feels more like our word "however," which can appear in the second position. The effect is to change the direction of the phrase after it is started.

I -- (MW) The pronoun is used here explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since this information is already in the verb, the sense is repetitive as we say "I myself."

tell -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

untranslated "all"-- (MW) The untranslated word "all", "whole", or "every". Appears here. The sense is "every" to the following word meaning "one".

anyone who  -- The word translated as "anyone who" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The sense here is "one" to the above "every".

untranslated "when"-- (MW) The untranslated word "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when". -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

divorces -- (WW) The Greek verb translated as "divorces " means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]".  It is not the future tense, but the aorist which can refer to past, present, or future but indicates a specific point in time. This is not the usual Greek word for divorce. See  Matthew 5:31 for more about this use of this word.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

wife,-- The word translated as "wife" is the general word for "woman." However, saying "his woman" in Greek has the same general meaning as referring to a wife.

except -- The Greek word translated as "except" means "out beside," "besides," "except," "exclusive of," "beside" or "except." Jesus only uses this word here. This form is not used outside of the Bible and one other Greek document referencing the Bible. It also does not appear in the Septuagint, the Greek OT. The word means literally "from the outside."

untranslated "reason"-- (MW) The untranslated word "reason" is from logos, which is the Greek word normally translated as "word" in the Gospels. This verse is a good example of the fact that it doesn't really mean "word". The word primarily means "calculation", "reason" and "reckoning." It is the word from which we get our word "logic." Jesus uses it in the way we use "concept", "idea" and, here, "reason". More about this word in this article.

for  -- This word "for"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English sich as "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive verbs. 

sexual immorality,The word translated as "fornication" usually means "prostitution" when applied to a woman. The original Greek concept includes adultery but also includes other forms of sexual immorality, including homosexuality, incest, prostitution, and so on. This Greek word is the root for the English word, "pornography." The English word "debauchery" captures many aspects of this word. It is also a synonym for idolatry, worshiping idols. This connects the worship of false gods with sexual immorality.

makes -- The word translated as "makes" is almost always translated as "do" in the Gospels. However, this verse is a good example of why it should usually be translated according to its primary meaning which is more the sense of "make", "produce," "perform," and "create."

her  -- The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

the victim of -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "the victim of " in the Greek source.

adultery:-- (WF) The verb translated as "adultery" is narrowly defined as sex with another's wife. A married man having sex with an unmarried woman was not considered adultery. However, sex with a married woman by anyone not her husband was considered adultery by both the woman and the man, punishable by death and considered one of the chief crimes along with idolatry and murder. It is not an active verb here, but it is a passive verb. Christ uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray" or, in the passive, "to become betrayed". In English, we would simplify the phrase, "makes her be  betrayed,"

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

anyone who -- The word translated as "anyone who" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The sense here is "one" to the above "every".

marries  -- The "shall marry" means "marries  " but it also means having sexual intercourse generally. It means "to take a woman" or "to take a lover." It is not the future tense, but a form that indicated something that might happen, which is indicated by the introductory "if".

a divorced woman  (WW, WF) The Greek verb translated as "a divorced woman" means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]".  The word is an participle as an adjective modifying the subject of the sentence. It is passive, single, feminine, which justifies the "woman",  and the past perfect tense so "having been loosened."

commits adultery. -- (WV) The verb translated as "to commit adultery" is narrowly defined as sex with another's wife.  Jesus uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray" or "defile." However, the form is either passive, "is defiled," or, more likely, "defiles himself."

NIV Translation Issues: 

12
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "all" or "every" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "shall" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "divorces" should be "loosen" or "free."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "wife" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "reason" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "the victim of" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "adultery" is a noun but a the passive infinitive of a verb.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a divorced woman" should be "loosened" or "freed."
  • WF - Wrong Form -- The verb "a divorced woman" is a passive, past perfect participle, so "having been divorced."
  •  WV - Wrong Voice -  The "commits adultery" is either passive or the middle voice "is defiled," or, more likely, "defiles himself."

NLT Analysis: 

But -- The term translated as "but" means that, but since it always appears in the second position in a phrase, it feels more like our word "however," which can appear in the second position. The effect is to change the direction of the phrase after it is started.

I -- (MW) The pronoun is used here explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since this information is already in the verb, the sense is repetitive as we say "I myself."

say -- The word translated as "I tell" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

untranslated "to you"-- (MW) The untranslated word "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause, "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

- (WW) The word translated as "a" means "all", "whole", or "every". Appears here. The sense is "every" to the following word meaning "one".

man  who -- (WW) The word translated as "a man " is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The sense here is "one" to the above "every".

untranslated "when"-- (MW) The untranslated word "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when". -- The Greek word meaning "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

divorces -- (WW) The Greek verb translated as "divorces " means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]".  It is not the future tense, but the aorist which can refer to past, present, or future but indicates a specific point in time. This is not the usual Greek word for divorce. See  Matthew 5:31 for more about this use of this word.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

wife,-- The word translated as "wife" is the general word for "woman." However, saying "his woman" in Greek has the same general meaning as referring to a wife.

unless -- The Greek word translated as "unless" means "out beside," "besides," "except," "exclusive of," "beside" or "except." Jesus only uses this word here. This form is not used outside of the Bible and one other Greek document referencing the Bible. It also does not appear in the Septuagint, the Greek OT. The word means literally "from the outside."

untranslated "reason"-- (MW) The untranslated word "reason" is from logos, which is the Greek word normally translated as "word" in the Gospels. This verse is a good example of the fact that it doesn't really mean "word". The word primarily means "calculation", "reason" and "reckoning." It is the word from which we get our word "logic." Jesus uses it in the way we use "concept", "idea" and, here, "reason". More about this word in this article.

she has been -- (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "she has been" in the Greek source.

unfaithful -- The word translated as "fornication" usually means "prostitution" when applied to a woman. The original Greek concept includes adultery but also includes other forms of sexual immorality, including homosexuality, incest, prostitution, and so on. This Greek word is the root for the English word, "pornography." The English word "debauchery" captures many aspects of this word. It is also a synonym for idolatry, worshiping idols. This connects the worship of false gods with sexual immorality.

causes -- The word translated as "causes " is almost always translated as "do" in the Gospels. However, this verse is a good example of why it should usually be translated according to its primary meaning which is more the sense of "make", "produce," "perform," and "create."

her  -- The word translated as "her" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

commit  adultery:-- (WF) The verb translated as "commit  adultery" is narrowly defined as sex with another's wife. A married man having sex with an unmarried woman was not considered adultery. However, sex with a married woman by anyone not her husband was considered adultery by both the woman and the man, punishable by death and considered one of the chief crimes along with idolatry and murder. It is not an active verb here, but it is a passive verb. Christ uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray" or, in the passive, "to become betrayed". In English, we would simplify the phrase, "makes her be  betrayed,"

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

anyone who -- The word translated as "anyone who" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The sense here is "one" to the above "every".

marries  -- The "shall marry" means "marries  " but it also means having sexual intercourse generally. It means "to take a woman" or "to take a lover." It is not the future tense, but a form that indicated something that might happen, which is indicated by the introductory "if".

a divorced woman  (WW, WF) The Greek verb translated as "a divorced woman" means "to loose from" "to set free", "to release", "to acquit",  and "to divorce [a wife]".  The word is an participle as an adjective modifying the subject of the sentence. It is passive, single, feminine, which justifies the "woman",  and the past perfect tense so "having been loosened."

also -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "also" in the Greek source.

commits adultery. -- (WV) The verb translated as "to commit adultery" is narrowly defined as sex with another's wife.  Jesus uses the word translated as "adultery" more broadly to mean "betraying your vows" or, more simply, "betray" or "defile." However, the form is either passive, "is defiled," or, more likely, "defiles himself."

NLT Translation Issues: 

14
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "I myself."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "to you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a" should be "all" or "every."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "man who" should be "who."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "divorces" should be "loosen" or "free."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "wife" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "reason" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "she has been" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "commit adultery" is a noun but a the passive infinitive of a verb.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "a divorced woman" should be "loosened" or "freed."
  • WF - Wrong Form -- The verb "a divorced woman" is a passive, past perfect participle, so "having been divorced."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "he" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WV - Wrong Voice -  The "commits adultery" is either passive or the middle voice "is defiled," or, more likely, "defiles himself."

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Sexual immorality is Jesus's metaphor for worshiping false gods. The word translated as "fornication/sexual immorality." is the word that Demosthenes used to vilify a corrupt individual (speech 19, section 287), and Aeschines, another Greek orator, used it to describe the lewdness of another (speech 2).

The Spoken Version: 

“I myself, however?” he continued, touching his chest, but without pomposity. Instead he displayed a deep and uncharacteristic sadness.
“I am telling you all,” he announced, his voice building up to something important, “that everyone setting loose that woman of his...”
He paused, perhaps to heighten the impact of his next words.
“For the reason of cheating?” boomed a deep voice, taking advantage of the pause.
“Outside of a reason of cheating,” the Teacher clarified.  He paused dramatically again then finished sorrowfully,“He causes her to become defiled!”
Again, he accentuated the word, “defiled,” making it sound even more loathsome than earlier.  This word was a surprise, especially for the Judeans. He was equating the legal “loosening” of a woman, as they call divorce, with adultery, which was saying that it was as bad as murder.
He said this with such great sorrow that it communicated itself to the crowd.  As we thought about it, again that deep voice shouted out.
“And the woman divorced for cheating can her lover marry her?” the voice thundered.
“And anyone, when he marries she who has loosened herself,” the Master added even more sadly. “He defiles himself.”
His sense of the tragedy of this swept through the crowd.

evidence: 

31.00

Front Page Date: 

May 8 2020