Matthew 22:10 So those servants went out into the highways,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 22:10 So those servants went out into the highways, and gathered together all as many as they found, both bad and good: and the wedding was furnished with guests.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And the servants there, going out into the ways, brought together all that they discovered, both the worthless and the worthwhile and the wedding room was filled up of [those] reclining [at the table].

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The KJV doesn't really translate the last part of this verse as much as try to communicate its general meaning without translating it. The terms translated as "good" and "bad" doesn't really capture those ideas, but they are always translated this way in the KJV and other Bible versions.

The word translated as "so" is the conjunction usually translated as "and."

The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

The noun translated as "servants" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

The word translated as "Went out" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." It is not an active verb, but a verb in the form of an adjective, "going out."

The word translatead as "highways" here is a word that was kind of untranslated in the previous verse (Mat 22:9 ) where a different word was translated as "highways." The word means "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." It is plural indicating more than one way.

The Greek word translated as "gather together" means "to bring together." It has many different usesand has the sense of "to unite" a group of people.

The word translated as "as many as" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this", "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

The term used for "they found" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

The word translated as "evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. It is an adjective, but when used as a noun, therefore, "what is worthless."

The adjective translated as "good" means "useful", "worthwhile," and "of high quality. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."

"The wedding is from a different Greek word than that one translated as "wedding" thus far in the story. The word used in the source we use today means "bridal chamber" meaning either the room in the wedding takes place or the room of the marriage bed. It is from the Greek word meaning "the bride groom."

"Was furnished" is from a Greek verb meaning to "fill", "fill full," "to be filled," and, in the passve, "to be full of," and "to be satisfied." The form here is passive.

The word translated as "with guests" doesn't mean that at all. It means "be laid up" as a votive offering in the temple, "to be dedicated", "lie at table" and "reclining." It is, however, in the form of a possessive adjective acting as a noun. "of reclining [at the table]." Sinee guests reclined at table sides in Greek times, this

Why does the king send his servants to the highways? The translation is a little confusing. The diexodoswas the area just outside a city's gates where the road ended. This is where a variety of people gathered: people from the countryside coming to the city, people looking for work, people waiting for a carand avan, and so on. These people were transients, going or coming from somewhere else, or just people who had nowhere to go looking for an opportunity. They camped outside the city by the road because it was cheaper than staying in the city.

The terms used for "good" and "bad" are closer in meaning to "productive" and "worthless." The "worthless" were those that were by the highway because they had nothing else to do and nowhere else to go. The "productive" were those who had jobs and homes but who were simply in transition.

So, those who can hear the message are those caught in between one thing and another. This includes both those looking for a situations in life and those whose lives are in transition, from one thing to the next. These people are open to hearing something new, something different because they are already unsettled and not focused on what they "should" be doing.

"Worthy" is from axios, which means "having weight", "counterbalancing," and "worth" in the sense of one thing balancing another.

"Highways" is from diexodos, which means "outlet", "passage", "roads out of town," and "way out from." Literally, it means "through exit."

"Bad" is from poneros and "good" is from agathos. As we discuss extensively in this page, these terms mean "worthless" and "good" in the sense of doing good deeds respectively. "Good" is from agathos, which "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." Agathos is not the usual term translated as "good," in the Gospels, which is kalos, meaning "beautiful."

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "So" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐξελθόντες (part pl aor act masc nom) "Went out" is from exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true." --

οἱ δοῦλοι (noun pl masc nom) "Servants" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave."

ἐκεῖνοι (adj pl masc nom) "Those" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

τὰς ὁδοὺς (noun pl masc acc) "The highways" is from hodos, which means literally "the way" or "the road" but which is used symbolically to mean "a way of doing things" or "a philosophy of life." It is interesting that a term joining a path with philosophy exists in many languages from the west to the east.

συνήγαγον (verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Gathered together" is from synago, which means "bring together", "gather together," "pit [two warriors against each other]", "join in one", "unite", "make friends of", "lead with one", "receive", "reconcile", "draw together", "narrow", "contract", "conclude [from premises]", " infer," and "prove."

πάντας (adj pl masc acc) "All" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." -- The word translated as "all things" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

οὓς (pron pl masc acc) "As many as" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

εὗρον, (verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "They found" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

πονηρούς (adj pl masc acc) "Bad" is from poneros, which means "burdened by toil", "useless," and "worthless." In a moral sense, it means "worthless", "base," and "cowardly."

τε "Both" is from te, which means "both...and," when joining single words.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀγαθούς: (adj pl masc acc) "Good" is from agathos which means "good" and, when applied to people, "well-born", "gentle", "brave," and "capable." When applied to things, it means "serviceable", "morally good," and "beneficial." -

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐπλήσθη (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Was furnished" is from pimplemi, which means to "fill", "fill full", "satisfy", "glut", "​discharge" an office, and, in the passive, "to be filled", "to be full of", "to satisfied", "have enough" of a thing, and of females, "become pregnant."

νυμφὼν (noun sg masc nom) "The wedding" is from numphon, which can either be the room of the marriage bed or marriage ceremony. Numphios is "bridegroom."

ἀνακειμένων. (part pl pres mp masc gen) "With guest" is from anakeimai, which means to "be laid up" as a votive offering in the temple, "to be dedicated", "to be set up" as a statue in public, "to be put aside", "lie at table," and "recline."

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "ways" means "way of life" as much as the high ways.

There is the sense of different types of people being discovered and brought together. 

Related Verses: