Matthew 22:4 Again, he sent forth other servants,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 22:4 Again, he sent forth other servants, saying, Tell them which are bidden, Behold, I have prepared my dinner: my oxen and my fatlings are killed, and all things are ready: come unto the marriage.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Once more, he dispatched different slaves, repeating, "Say to the ones that had been called, look here, I have finished making my lunch, the beef and burning fat and readying everything until the weddings.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek word translated as "again" means "back", "backward", "contradiction," "once more," and "in turn."

The "he send forth" here is from a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle."

The word translated as "other" means "other", "different," and "other than true."

The noun translated as "servant" means "slave." It is translated as "servant" to update the Bible.

The word translated as "saying" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching. It is in the form of an adjective, "saying."

"Tell" (a different Greek word from above) is from a verb means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming. It is in the form of a command.

"Them which are bidden" The word is like our word "call" beause it means both "to summon" and also "to name." This first form is an infinitive ("to call") and the second is in the form of a noun ("the ones having been called.")

"Behold" is from an adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!"

The verb translated as "I have prepared" means to "get ready," "prepare", "make ready," and "to cause to prepare." It is in a form that indicates the action has been completed.

The word translated as "dinner" means "breakfast" or "lunch."

"Oxen" is from the Greek word for "bull."

"Fatlings" is an invented noun from the verb meaning to "fatten." This does not describe an animal but the fat of the animal.

The word translated as "killed" is not a word that Christ commonly uses for "slay" or "kill." It specifically means "to offer by burning" and refers to slaying for a sacrifice. The sense here is not only has it been killed but cooked. It is in the form of an adjective.

The word translated as "all things" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

"Are ready" is not from a verb, but an adjective meaning "at hand", "ready," and "prepared".

The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure. The sense here seems more of the time.

The word for "wedding" here is plural. In the previous verse, it was translated as "marriage." This word is used more frequently in the plural so it doesn't necessarily reflect a marriage to multiple wives.

Greek Vocabulary: 

πάλιν "Again" is from palin (palin), which means "back", "backward", "contradiction", "again", "once more," and "in turn."

ἀπέστειλεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "He sent forth" is from apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch."

ἄλλους "Other" is from allos, which means "another", "one besides", "of another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "as well", "besides," (with numerals: "yet", "still", "further"), "of other sort", "other than what is", "untrue", "unreal", "other than right", "wrong", "bad", "unworthy," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

δούλους "Servants" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave."

λέγων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Saying" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." It has a secondary meaning "pick out," "choose for oneself", "pick up", "gather", "count," and "recount." A less common word that is spelt the same means "to lay", "to lay asleep" and "to lull asleep."

Εἴπατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Tell" is from eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

τοῖς κεκλημένοις (part pl perf mp masc dat) "Them that were bidden" is from kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand."

Ἰδοὺ "Behold is from idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

τὸ ἄριστόν (noun sg neut acc) "Dinner" is from ariston, which originally meant "breakfast" but later meant "luncheon."

μου (pron 1st sg masc gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

ἡτοίμακα, (verb 1st sg perf ind act) "I have prepared" is from hetoimazô, which means to "get ready," "prepare", "make ready," and "to cause to prepare."

οἱ ταῦροί (noun pl masc nom) "Oxen" is from tauros, which means "bull."

μου (pron 1st sg masc gen) "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὰ σιτιστὰ (adj pl neut acc) "Fatlings" is from sitistos, which is thought to be a form of sisteus, which means "fed up," and "fatted."

τεθυμένα, (part sg perf mp neut/fem nom) "Killed" is from thyro, which means tto "offer by burning", "sacrifice", "slay", "slaughter", "celebrate [with sacrifices, offerings]," "the flesh of the sacrifice."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πάντα (adj pl neut nom/acc) "All things" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

ἕτοιμα: "Are ready" is from hetoimos, which means "at hand", "ready", "prepared", of persons, "ready", "active", "zealous," of the mind, "ready", "bold," and as an adverb, "readily", "willingly."

δεῦτε "Come" is from deute, which is an adverb that means "come here" and "come hither." It is not a verb so it doesn't contain the regular information about the subject found in a Greek verb. -- "Come" is not from a verb but from an adverb used like saying "over here" in English to call someone to where you are.

εἰς "Unto" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τοὺς γάμους. "The marriage" is both from the from gamos, which means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock."