Mark 4:3 Hearken; Behold, there went out a sower to sow...

KJV Verse: 

Mar k4:3 Hearken; Behold, there went out a sower to sow:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Listen all of you. Imagine: he went out, the one who sows to sow.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is odd because it starts with two commands (or requests, both are the same in Greek), but the first command is addressed to the group and teh second one to an individual. We know this because of the verb endings, which are first plural and then singular. The "harken"  ("listen") is addressed  to the group, but the" behold" ("see") is addressed to a single person. Why? Because, Jesus is asking to "see" in the imagination, which we can only do individually, not as a group.  However, this "behold" also works like an adverbial exclamation when something is revealed, like "viola" in French. The Greek word for "sower" and "to sow" are both the same verb. That verb is from the same root word as the Greek word for "seeds." "Seeds" are Jesus's symbol for information in general and spiritual information, that is, the good news, specifically.

KJV Analysis: 

Hearken; "Harken" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.  The form is a command or requiest addressed to a group.

Behold, "Behold" is a verbal command meaning "See!" and "Look!" It is from the most common word meaning "to see" in Greek. It is a command or request address to a single person because it involves seeing in the mind. In a humorous vein, it is also an adverbial exclamation like we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or "voila" in French. "Look!" or "See!" comes closest in English. Jesus uses it both ways.

there This word is added because the verb comes before the subject. However, the pronoun "he" would be more accurate, reflecting what Jesus's listeners heard with the verb.

went out The word translated as "went" means literally "to go or come out," but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." The tense is not the past, but a form that indicates something happening at a specific point in time, past, present, or future.

a The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  This is the opposite from the indefinite article, "a", which does not exist in Greek but which can be added in translated when there is no definitive article. 

sower The Greek word translated as "the sower" is a verb that means specifically to "sow seeds" and "to scatter" as in sowing seeds. It is in the form of an adjective, "sowing." When preceded by the article, it has the sense of "the one sowing."

to sow: This is the same word as above, but in a different form, an infinitive. The Greek verb translated as "to sow" is a verb that means specifically to "sow seeds" and "to scatter" as in sowing seeds.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἀκούετε. ( verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Hearken" is from akouô (akouo), which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

ἰδοὺ (verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold" is from idou (idou), which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

ἐξῆλθεν ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Went forth" is from exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " or "to come out."

(art sg masc nom) "A" is the Greek definite article hos, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." This is the opposite from the indefinite article, "a", which does not exist in Greek but which can be added in translated when there is no definitive article. 

σπείρων (part sg pres act masc nom) "A sower" is from speiro, which means "to sow a seed", "to beget offspring", "to scatter like a seed," and "to sow a field."

σπεῖραι. ( verb aor inf act ) "To sow" is from speiro, which means "to sow a seed", "to beget offspring", "to scatter like a seed," and "to sow a field."

Related Verses: 

Jun 11 2019